MEETING MINUTES & TALK REPORTS

MINUTES OF ORDINARY MEETING 27 SEPTEMBER 2017


1 Chairman Bev Joicey welcomed the 30 members present and guests Trixie Horseman and the day’s speakers. There were 11 apologies. He stated that full details of the Christmas Lunch would soon be circulated. The minutes of 13 September were read, approved and signed.

3 Bill Green introduced Phillip Bastow and Robert Nicholson to talk about "the Romano British Settlement at Hagg Farm, Swaledale.” Phillip from Reeth is a nationally renowned cabinet maker and Robert worked in the pharmaceutical industry. Both are leading members of the Swaledale Archaeological Group.

The site, on a hill farm above Grinton, has been known for many years but SWAG began their investigations in earnest in 2012. They explained their methodologies; measuring the landscape, IR, geophysical surveying and the digging of trenches. The major discoveries have been both flagged and cobbled floors and a selection of artifacts. A unique feature of the site is a number of round houses and SWAG are now extending their area of search on the site. There is a key unanswered question about what the settlement was used for. Was it industrial (to do with the lead mines which were well known to the Romans), agricultural, domestic or military (given the Roman presence at Catterick)? The one feature which seems certain is that this site is unique, with e.g. some of the pottery (dating from the 1st to the 4th centuries) being far from common. After the Romans left Britain in the late 4th century it appears that the settlement was abandoned. It was clearly more than a mere farm but the question of its function remains open.

There were many questions including the covering up of the parts so far investigated, what lay beneath the stone floors, and how the buildings’ walls were made.


4 Next meeting Weds 11 October, John Dickinson.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

XMAS LUNCH

This year’s Christmas Lunch will be held at Catterick Golf Club on Wednesday 13th December. The cost is likely to be about £19 and a sample menu is attached. Full details of signing up etc will be dealt with at our next meeting.

Starters 

Ham Terrine

Ham Hock & Pea Terrine

With Mixed Salad & Brioche Toast


Home-made Soup

Creamy Butternut squash Soup

With Cranberry & Gruyere Croutons


Home-made Pheasant Ravioli

With Wild Mushroom

& Brandy Sauce 

West Country Crab Cakes

With Coriander Flavoured Breadcrumbs

And Sweet Chilli Sauce 

Melting Brie Wedges

Breaded Somerset Brie Wedges

Served with Caramelised Onions 

 

 

Main Course 

Traditional Roast Turkey

With All The Christmas

Trimmings

Tender Roast Topside of Beef

With Horseradish Dumplings

& Red Wine Sauce


Home-made Pork Wellington

Succulent Pork Tenderloin Encased in Pastry

With Creamy Mustard Sauce


Oven Baked Cod Fillet

With Chestnut & Herb Crust

Served with a Hollandaise Sauce


Mushroom & Chestnut Risotto

Creamy Risotto with Mushrooms,

Chestnuts & Lovage 

  

All Served with Roast & Mashed Potatoes

And Fresh Vegetables 

Desserts

 Traditional Christmas Pudding

Served with Cream

Brandy Sauce

 Sweet Mince Ice-cream

Infused with Brandy

Served in Home-made Waffle Basket 

Cranberry, Apple & Mulled Wine

Crumble

Served with Vanilla Custard 

Lemon & Raspberry Posset

Silky Smooth Posset with Citrus Flavour

Served with Home-made Shortbread


Forest Fruit Christmas Trifle

Layers of Fruits of the Forest Compote

With Madeira Sponge & Whipped Cream

 Coffee & Mince Pies

---------------------------------------------------- 

MINUTES OF THE MEETING OF 23 AUGUST 2017

1 Alan Lomax, acting as Chair due to the illness of Bev Joicey, welcomed the 25 members present and the day’s speaker Ian Robertson. There were 11 apologies.

2 The minutes of 9 August were read, approved and signed. A proposal was put from the Committee that a donation would be made to an appropriate charity following the death of a member. This was agreed unanimously. Widows will be invited to Club lunches. The latest edition of the national magazine was available.

3 John Horseman invited Ian Robertson, Headteacher at Richmond School to talk about his life in the job. Ian has been a Head since 1997 and is to retire at Christmas. Ian said it had been a mostly enjoyable career although he shared the view of most teachers that over time there had been an excessive agenda for change. Headship today is more to do with business and management. A major joy was the daily contact with talented young people and teachers, although both groups can be challenging. Ian recounted several episodes with awkward pupils and a python and remarked that schools today are expected to deal with many of society’s problems, citing examples of the cyber world, obesity and security. He listed other current issues in education such as teacher recruitment, ‘super heads’, parents’ expectations and mobile phones and social media. Perhaps, he said, pupils today are presented with too much choice, which may undermine their sense of resilience. Ian’s talk stimulated many and wide ranging questions and in thanking him Alan Lomax said it had been a very stimulating and thought provoking talk.


4 Next meeting – Weds 13 September – Mike Bacon introducing Bowman Bradley on “The Engineering Skills Crisis in the North”

................................................................

MINUTES OF ORDINARY MEETING OF 9 AUGUST 2017

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1 Chairman Bev Joicey welcomed the 30 members present. There were 8 apologies.

2 There was a joyful celebration –with cake – of Les Jobson’s 95th birthday and 25 years membership of the Club.

3 August birthdays were announced – John Ashton 81, John Harland 79, Chris Robinson 75 and Trevor Thurlow 63.

4 The minutes of 26 July were read, approved and signed.


5 Peter Clarke “The Right Place At The Right Time”

Peter began by wondering how many in the room would say his title also applied to them. Having failed the 11+ but passing the 13+ Peter went on to Hull University where he was awarded his PhD for research into Gas Chemistry. He joined the staff at Durham to teach and do research. The University dates from 1832 and is still collegiate and proud of it. It has expanded from 3,000 students in Peter’s early days to over 18,000 now. He made a passing reference to ‘despotic professors ’ (which went without challenge). Over the years his role was divided into 3s: research, teaching and administration. Various secondments took place, particularly at Shell and he seemed a little nostalgic for the selection procedures of his time as an admissions tutor i.e. interviews.  He did Open University work and his expertise in thermodynamics led to specializing in modeling hybrid car engines. In summary Peter said he would be happy to do it all over again. Question touched on problem solving in teaching, contrasts between the arts and sciences and is lecturing still the best teaching method? Bev thanked Peter for his insights into that world.

6 Next meeting – Weds 23 August – “Life & Times of a Head.”

----------------------------------------------------------------------

MINUTES OF ORDINARY MEETING 26 JULY 2017

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1 Chairman welcomed the 26 members present and guest speaker Mike Irving. There were 5 apologies. The members stood in memory of Bob Burrell Cory who recently passed away.

2 Bev reported that the trip to Keswick had gone very well  and thanked Tony Orton, John Dickinson and Alan Lomax for their help in running the visit. He pointed out that the number had been right on the low edge for making coach hire viable.

3 The minutes of the meeting of 12 July were read, approved and signed.

4 Francis Rose introduced Mike Irving to talk on “The Life of a River Pilot.”

Mike gave an informative account of his life at sea and especially his work piloting ships into and out of Teesport. With cartoons and wry humour the talk was also most entertaining. It became clear that he has plenty of material for another talk. After 16 years at sea as an apprentice (2 of which were blighted by seasickness) and against the wishes of his parents he took to piloting. He explained many of the changes in the job he has witnessed, from the enormous size of today’s vessels to improvements (or perhaps not) in the ways of getting on and off the ships at sea. He listed some of the customs (such as not mentioning PIGS) and dead pilots turning into cormorants. Towards the end of his career Mike became involved in the safety and rescue aspects of the job, training others and volunteering to throw himself into the North Sea. By the time he retired he was enjoying being a pilot just as much as he had at the start.

5 Next meeting – Weds 9 August – Peter Clarke on “The Right Place at the Right Time.”

------------------------------------------------------


MINUTES OF THE ORDINARY MEETING OF 12 JULY 2017

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1 Chairman Bev Joicey welcomed the 25 members present, and guests Maura Deighton, Ruth Eyles and Maureen Reid as well as today’s speakers There were 9 apologies.

July birthdays were announced – Roy Cross (Hon) 90, Harry Hodgkiss 89, Ken Stephens 82, Chris Woodard 73 and Michael Reid 67.

The minutes of the previous meeting were read and signed.

2 Steven Charlton introduced Ann Wall and Eileen Brereton to speak on “Home Comforts - The Role of the Red Cross Auxiliary Hospitals in the North Riding, 1914 – 1919.” They are both retired nurses and he had been ministered by them in the past.

Ann and Eileen explained that they had begun a modest project to commemorate the centenary of the outbreak of the war in East Rounton, where there had been a hospital. Their work expanded beyond their expectations and they now have a vast collection of documents, ephemera, artifacts and photos from all across the North Riding. They give talks, help with family connections and have written a book. There were 32 buildings in the county used as Red Cross hospitals. Leading figures included Florence and Gertrude Bell of East Rounton and several hospitals were set up in large country houses such as Hovingham and Dunscombe. In Richmond Frenchgate House and Swale House were used. The Red Cross volunteers were trained in first aid and cookery and worked alongside nurses from the Voluntary Aid Detachment. From August until October there will be an exhibition at York Museum and a memorial to the nurses is planned for the National Arboretum. Bev thanked Ann and Eileen for a wonderful talk and for allowing the meeting to handle and examine their items.

3 Next meeting – Weds 26 July – Francis Rose introducing Mike Irving on “The Life and Times of a River Pilot.”

---------------------------------------------------------------

MINUTES OF ORDINARY MEETING 14 JUNE 2017

 1 Chairman Bev Joicey welcomed the 34 members present and guest Vanessa Thomas. There were 4 apologies. 

2 Today is effectively the final opportunity to sign up for the Keswick trip. June birthdays: Geoffrey Hope & John Horseman (both 82), Michael Gauntlett (77), Simon Cherry, Francis Rose & Roger Frier (all 70) and Richard Wright (69).

 3 The minutes of 24 May were read, approved and signed. 

4 Brian Thomas “Trafalgar”. Brian began by thanking Phillip Harvey and his wife Vanessa for their technical help. His interest in the battle derived from his reading of the ‘Hornblower’ books and those of Patrick O’Brien as well as his pastime of modeling ships. He explained the international situation that led to the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars and that Napoleon was much less competent at sea warfare than on land. A detailed classification of the Royal Navy’s shipping, weaponry and manpower was provided, with reference paid to the many phrases used which became part of the English language. Using many superb illustrations Brian told the story of the battle itself on 21 October 1805. The lesser known but crucial part played by Admiral Collingwood was explained. Besides the destruction and capture of many French and Spanish ships, their casualties were nearly 4 times higher than the British, although HMS “Victory”, Nelson’s flagship had to be towed home due to the extensive damage and the death of Nelson was a major tragedy. Trafalgar issued in a century of British domination of the world’s sealanes.

There were many questions for Brian including on signaling, the role of the Marines, and the construction of masts. 

5 Next Meeting – Weds 23 June – Peter Norton “My Career in Mining”.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

MINUTES OF ORDINARY MEETING 28 JUNE 2017

 1 Chairman Bev Joicey welcomed the 30 members present. There  were 4 apologies, no guests and no welfare reports. Final details were given for the trip to Keswick.

 2 The minutes of 14th June were read, approved and signed.

 3 Keith Robson introduced member Dr Peter Norton to talk on his life in mining.

 Peter first worked for the National Coal Board as a geologist aka gynaecologist, beginning underground in Durham but then surfacing to work in open cast mines. His specialism was stabilizing pit slopes and ground water removal. Much of his work was pioneering eg new pumps. Large – very large – machines were illustrated and explained. His doctorate from Nottingham took only 7 years and then he worked for British Coal as R & D manager until becoming a victim of the ruthless determination of Margaret Thatcher to drastically reduce the coal industry in the UK. Peter set up his own consulting company and took the meeting on a world tour of his work, including Russia, Kazakhstan, the USA, Sumatra and South Africa. The workforce in Sumatra was particularly praised but Russia provided severe challenges both underground and in the bars. He was involved in the privatisation of British Coal, helping to reduce the bill by £250 million. He has hopes of lithium extraction from ground water from Cornish mines and is a strong supporter of fracking.

 Questions included spontaneous combustion, coal reserves in the UK, and pollution and flooding in Dales lead mines.

 4 Next meeting – Weds 12 July “The role of the Red Cross in Auxilliary Hospitals in the Dales in World War 1” by Anne Wall and Eileen Brereton, introduced by Stephen Charlton.

________________________________________________

MINUTES OF THE ORDNARY MEETING OF 24 MAY 2017

 

1 Chairman Bev Joicey welcomed the 23 members present and guests Ann Orton and Wendy Joicey. There were 10 apologies. Nigel Copestake has a bad back and Peter Clarke is recovering after a hip operation. Bev invited the meeting to take a few moments to reflect on the tragic event in Manchester. Copies of the latest issue of the “Probus magazine” were made available.

 

2 The trip to Keswick has 30 signed up thus making the coach hire viable. The next meeting will be the deadline for numbers for the theatre performance.

 

3 The minutes of 10 May were read, approved and signed.

 

4 Tony Orton introduced his wife All to talk on “Augustus Sussex Millbank”.

 

Augustus (born 29 October 1827) was a leading member of a well to do but not aristocratic family with homes at Thorpe Perrow and Barningham Park. His life story is well documented thanks his diary and Ann’s researches. He was a Whig, well read, a snappy dresser, asthmatic (hence no army service) and an admirer of the ladies (although never married).  He spent time in Paris involved in the revolutions of 1848 but returned to Barningham in time for the ‘Glorious 12th’, being an avid hunter and shooter. In later life he continued to travel abroad, was a JP, carried out several charitable works in Barningham eg the Penny Bank, and set up an innovative model farm. He died on 10th April 1887 leaving an enigmatic legacy to one Thomas Coates He was buried at Barningham.

Thanking Ann Bev said it was very interesting to see such a detailed story behind the scenes of some of the area’s major houses.

 

5 Next meeting – Weds 14 June – Brian Thomas on “Trafalgar”.


MINUTES OF 10 MAY 2017


1 Members observed a minute’s silence in memory of retired member Fred Jary.

2 The Chairman Bev Joicey welcomed the 28 members present. There were 10 apologies.

3 The minutes of the Special General Meeting of 24 April were read, approved and signed.

4 May birthdays were announced – Ray Sheahan 73 and Michael Walton 72.

5 The Chairman urged members and their guests to sign up for the Keswick trip.

6 The minutes of the ordinary meeting of 24 April were read, approved and signed.


7 Club member Simon Cherry gave an illustrated talk entiotled “It’s a Vet’s Life”


Simon began by circulating 2 mystery objects. After qualifying at Edinburgh University Simon worked as a vet, first in Beverley, then Hong Kong and then Beverley again. His experience encompassed both domestic and farm animals and even those from the circus. In Hong Kong he worked with race horses, dairy cattle and a killer whale. His illustrations ranged from him doing caesarians, slides of nasty diseases and various breeds of farm animals he had treated over the years such as Belgian Blue cattle, very popular in East Yorkshire. The objects  turned out to be sheep  hair balls, much to everyone’s surprise. Bev thanked him for a fascinating insight into a different world.


8 Next Meeting – Weds 24 May – Tony Orton introducing wife Ann to speak on “Augustus Sussex.


--------------------------------------------------------------


MINUTES OF THE ORDINARY MEETING OF 26 APRIL 2017


1 The members stood for a minute’s silence in memory of Alec Butler who had sadly died on the previous day.

2 There were no guests. £2 members attended and there were 6 apologies.

3 It was reported that Mike Gauntlett has had a fall and sustained a broken arm.

4 The application for membership by Chris Barraclough (proposed by Alan Lomax and seconded by Ian Dawson) was approved unanimously.

5 The Chairman urged members to sign up for the trip to Keswick and to indicate whether or not they wanted to attend the theatre performance.

6 The secretary said he has a phone number from Mike Bacon which members can use to obtain free advice on abdominal aneurisms.

7 The minutes of 12 April (prepared by Alan Lomax) were read, approved and signed. There was an enquiry as to whether the club web site has fallen out of date. Enquires will be made.

8 Ray Sheahan    “Where Did Prussia Disappear?”

Ray said his theme was Prussia’s rise to become a Great Power and its eventual catastrophic disappearance in the middle of massive ethnic cleansing. Its heartland was Brandenburg with the name coming from the Slavic Prus who were exterminated by the Teutonic Knights in the 13th century. Frederick the Great (1740-86) turned the country into “an army with a state” and expanded eastwards, mainly at the expense of Poland. Political and economic influence over the rest of Germany grew throughout the 19th century sufficiently for Otto von Bismarck to engineer a united German Empire in 1871. The Versailles settlement following world war one saw Prussia reduced in size and divided by the Polish Corridor but much worse was to come after 1945. Millions of ethnic Germans were forced westwards and much of old Prussia became part of Poland. Throughout the talk Ray showed maps of the changing size and shape of Prussia over the centuries.

Questions and comments touched on the German psyche, the German eastward diaspora prior to 1939 and comparing race and ethnicity.

9 Next meeting – Weds 10 May- Simon Cherry “It’s A Vet’s Life’


MINUTES OF 22 FEBRUARY 2017


1 Chairman Bev Joicey welcomed all present (27) and Alan Lomax’s guest Chris Barrowclough. Alan was unable to attend as his wife Audrey was in hospital. Les Jobson and Alec Butler were awol at Thirsk Probus. There were 6 other apologies.

2 Graham Berry was approved as a new member and the resignation of Tom Walter was announced due to moving house to improve his wife’s medical care.

3 The Chairman reminded members to let him have cheques and menu choices for the Spring Lunch as soon as possible. He also said full details of the trip to Keswick and its theatre will be circulated soon.

4 The minutes of 8 February were read, approved and signed.

5 Michael Larkman introduced Andrew Bull to talk on “A Policeman’s Lot is not a Happy One.”

Andrew joined the Met – the finest police force in the country he said – in 1977 and put in 33 years of service.  He described his initial training at Hendon, the issue of his warrant card and being posted to Lambeth, which really meant Brixton. He experienced the Grunwick Strike and various Brixton riots.  He spent time as a drummer in the Met Band, as a plainclothes observer and home beat officer. In 1987 he moved to the quieter area of Banstead and then joined the traffic section in Croydon, which he described as his best move ever. He worked as a trainer and in 1998 became a Collisions Investigator. During the talk he circulated helmets and truncheons and gave glimpses of his views of the various Commissioners of the Met under whom he had served.  He answered questions on the Stephen Lawrence affair, the role of plainclothes observers and the Broadwater Farm riots.

In thanking Andrew for “an informative and entertaining talk , giving an insight into the world of real policing” the Chairman casually mentioned that he originally hailed from Brixton.

Next Meeting – Weds 8 March -  Tony Baker introducing Dr Hannah Russ to talk on “Recent Discoveries at Scotch Corner.”


MINUTES OF MEETING OF 11 JANUARY 2017


1 Chairman Bev Joicey welcomed the 32 members present and wives Val Dawson and Jan Robinson. There were 7 apologies.


2 January birthdays were announced: Bob Burrell-Cory 86, Michael Larkman 82, John Deighton 79, Chris Donnison 72 & Colin Chitty 70.


3 The minutes of 23 November were read, approved and signed.

Ian Dawson “33 Years At Heathrow”

Ian recently flew his one millionth mile having begun at age 8 in a cross channel hop to Le Touquet. After working in insurance he worked for BOAC at Heathrow. Initially he was setting up computerized reservation systems when computers were very large and of limited scope. His talk combined his personal travelogue with the development of computing technology and capacity, beginning at a time of tapes and punch cards. Over the years he was able to make use of the cheap flights offered to staff, albeit at the mercy of the stand by ticket system but often accompanied by wife Val. Amongst the many places visited he highlighted 2 years in Brazil and working with Panam in the USA. Ian referred to the onset of competition between airlines following Freddy Laker’s breakthrough, the Queen’s Award to Industry and managing to fly on all 7 of the aircraft types used by British Airways including Concorde. After taking early retirement they have continued to fly the world, visiting 4 continents, and it was on the most recent trip that the 1 million was notched up. The Chairman thanked Ian for a fascinating insight into a world to envy. Questions followed on Gatwick, hairy moments in the air (none!), Concorde and variations between airlines in cabin services (very considerable).

4


5 Next meeting – 23 Jan Nigel Copestake introducing Rod Hine on “Astronomy”.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


MINUTES OF 23 NOVEMBER 2016


1 Chairman Bev Joicey welcomed the 28 members present and guest Ken Morris. There were 7 apologies.


2 The meeting unanimously approved the membership application from Michael Reid who had attended 2 meetings and been proposed by Michael Larkman and seconded by Ian Dawson.


3 The meeting observed 2 minutes silence in memory of Stephen Harwood who passed away last week. His funeral was in the afternoon and the Chairman would attend He had already written to the family.


4 Bob Burrell-Cory has been unable to attend recently due to regular hospital appointments on Wednesdays.


5 Following discussion about the merits and costs of the national Probus magazine it was decided on a majority vote to continue the subscription for a further year.


6 Interim Treasurer Ian Dawson reminded members that today was the last chance to sign up and pay for the Christmas Lunch and that annual subscriptions are due.


7 The minutes of 26 October were read, agreed and signed.


8 Chris Robinson “Churchill The Warrior Part One”


Chris explained that the thrust of the talk was to explain the contradictions and complexities of Churchill’s controversial career and personality by an approach based on his deep seated instinct as a warrior rather than simply a politician. This had begun in childhood with the present of toy soldiers. The talk went chronologically through childhood, school, Sandhurst, and early military experiences in Cuba, India and Africa. Churchill became convinced he was destined not to be killed in battle and always displayed great courage in combat. His several roles in the First World War were outlined. There were instances in the 1920s and 30s when the politician was affected by the warrior but the major episode in his life was becoming Prime Minister in 1940 and the talk ended at that point. Chris then offered (threatened?) to return at some point to complete the story.


Questions (and songs) touched on his bricklaying and his political fate and reputation after 1945.


9 Next Meetings – Weds 14 Dec – Xmas Lunch Catterick GC

  • Weds 11 January – Ian Dawson “33 Years

At Heathrow.”

Members were reminded that wives and partners may be invited to attend.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


MINUTES OF 26 OCTOBER 2016


1 Chairman Michael Larkman welcomed the 23 members present and his own guest, Michael Reid. There were 9 apologies. A new member was proposed and approved, Roman Pronyszyn.  It was reported that Roger Bishop has broken his arm, David Crane hopes to resume attendance soon, John Ashton’s membership is suspended (at his request) for a year, Tom Shovlin is alright and Fred Jary (who has left) has eyesight problems.


2 The minutes of 4 October were read, approved and signed. John Dickinson will represent the club at the Remembrance Day parade. Alan Lomax will collect Christmas Lunch and subscription payments.


3 The next meeting will be the AGM at 10.00am on 9 November and Chris Robinson asked members to let him know as soon as possible of any agenda items and nominations for committee posts. The meeting will be followed by a speaker, who is as yet uncertain in view of Roger Bishop’s indisposition.


4 Geoff Robinson reported that copies of next year’s programme would be available at the AGM.


4 Roger Frier “The Man Who Invented the 20th Century”


Roger suggested several candidates for this title but had selected Nikola Tesla, a rival to Edison and Marconi and a model for some of the ‘mad scientist.’  Tesla was a Serb born in 1856 who from his schooldays exhibited both genius and eccentricity.  His most lasting invention (among very many) was the AC aspect of electrical generators and appliances. After running away from home he dropped out of university, gambled a lot, and eventually went to the USA in 1885. He worked with Edison but they soon became rivals and he partnered instead with Westinghouse. There followed years of filing patents, seeking financial backing and experiments with such as X rays, radio waves, remote controlled boats, and bladeless turbines. He was based in Colorado Springs but moved back to New York when he was in a race – which he lost - with Marconi to transmit radio messages across the Atlantic. There were rumours about but no actual award of a Nobel prize and in the 1920s and 30s, still largely being financed by Westinghouse, he worked on long range electrical transmission, a VTOL plane and even an anti aircraft  ray gun.  He died in 1943 and is remembered in museums in Belgrade and Colorado and his name lives on in the ground breaking Tesla car and SI unit. Sadly his reputation is not as well known as perhaps he deserved, partly due to his habit of not writing much stuff down but keeping it instead in his extraordinary brain.

The Chairman thanked Roger for his talk on such a little known subject.


MINUTES OF 12 OCTOBER 2016


1 Chairman Michael Larkman welcomed the 28 members present and Bill Whaley, guest of Geoff Robinson. He also welcomed 2 Honorary members, Cedric Shaw and Phillip Cross. There were 8 apologies.

2 October birthdays were announced: John Ward 78, David Crane 77 and John Halkon 76.

3 The minutes of 28 September were read, approved and signed. Under matters arising there were appeals for volunteers to be Treasurer and to lay a wreath on Remembrance Sunday. (John Dickinson came forward for the latter.) There was also a reminder that the AGM on 9 November will begin at 10.00am.

4 Ian Dawson asked for payment as soon as possible for both the Christmas lunch (along with menu choices) and next year’s subscriptions. He will not be at the next meeting but Alan Lomax will receive cheques.

5 Chris Robinson mentioned the new name badges and a new signing in book with effect from the AGM. The new TV had been tried for using USB memory sticks for presentations to by pass use of lap tops and projectors. It works with individual images, music and videos but not packages such as power point.

6 Colin Chitty “The Oil Business – A Struggle To Control Prices”

Colin’s theme was that commodity production and therefore prices tend towards a cycle of glut then cutback making it difficult to guarantee a profit.  Oil is a hydrocarbon known for centuries and reserves  have 53 years available at current levels of consumption. Colin narrated the world history of oil in modern times, with its beginnings in Tsarist Russia and the USA. Its primary use before the era of the internal combustion engine was kerosene for lighting. For decades competition and control had large companies and their ‘robber baron’ leaders as the principal players. Names such as Rockefeller, Standard Oil, Shell and BO were mentioned. After the first world war national governments’ roles increased as they realized the need for supply security but from  the 1960s the industry has been dominated by the producer nations. These took steps such as nationalization to take charge and improve revenue.  There are several international cartels and agreements which attempt to control production and thus prices. OPEC is perhaps the best known. Although some market freedom was introduced in 1989 the market remains very complex and the most recent change has been the vastly increased amount of trading in futures and via electronic communication. Colin ended by saying it remains very difficult to predict price trends>For example it is expected that Russia and OPEC are about to cut production so who knows?

Questions and comments followed on the effect of Brexit, old brand names such as National Benzole and the differences between ‘light’ and ‘heavy’ crude oil.

Michael thanked Colin for a superb talk.

7 Next meetings – 26 October – Roger Frier

- 9 November – AGM and Roger Bishop


_________________________________________________________


MINUTES OF 14 SEPTEMBER 2016


1 Acting Chairman Bev Joicey welcomed the 25 members present, including new member David Heaton on his first full meeting. There were 8 apologies.


2 A minute’s silence was held in memory of Honorary member John Brennand. The order of service from his funeral was circulated.


3 September birthdays were announced – Cedric Shaw (Hon member) 93, Bill Gladstone (Hon member) 85, Alan Lomax 80, Roger Bishop 76, Michael Eyles 75 & Robert Riddell 70.


4 Bev stated that he hoped future lunches could be organized by himself, Tony Orton and John Dickinson. The vacancy for a new Treasurer has still to be filled.


5 Reminders were given of a Committee meeting on 28 September at 10am and the Club AGM on 9 November, also at 10am.


6 Minutes of the last meeting were read, approved and signed.


7 Alan Lomax reported that as the TV was now in a more visible position future speakers using a lap top could use the TV provided their lap top could be connected via an HDMI lead. The club might consider purchasing such a connection.


8 Robert Riddell “Pay More, Get Less”


Robert’s talk covered the various ways in which the nation had registered motor vehicles since their invention in 1895. Government action became necessary by 1903 due to the rapidly increasing numbers – 18,000 by 1904. The speed limit rose to 20mph, reckless driving became a crime, driver licences (but not tests) were introduced, and all vehicles had to be registered by the local council. As numbers continued to increase new forms of registration were introduced, notably in 1932, 1955, 1962 and 1983. Robert detailed each successive method, all of which used a combination of letters and numbers. Our current system began in 2001 and should last until 2050 when it can simply be reversed for another 50 years. The Queen has 6 vehicles with no number, the letter ’Q’ indicates a car of uncertain age and use of ‘D’ and ‘X’ between figures show a car of foreign diplomats. Robert took us through the world of personal plates which began as early as 1904 with Harry Tate’s ‘T8’. Very high prices can be paid e.g. ‘M1’ sold for £300,000 in 2006 and ‘A1’ could reach £1m is placed on the market today. The DVLA play a commercial part in this market and the weekend newspapers advertise plates by the thousands

Questions and comments touched on transfers between vehicles, the legality of old style plates, and that drivers do not own the number, merely an ’entitlement to use.’   

Bev thanked Robert for his enlightening and informative talk,


9 Next meeting – Weds 28 September – Alec Butler on “Thornaby, Yorkshire”


........................................................................

24 th AUGUST 2016


1 Chairman Michael Larkman welcomed the 27 members present. There were no guests and 8 apologies.


2 The Secretary announced he had been sent details of the services of Able Care Homes and he would make these available to any member who would like to know more.


3 The minutes of 10 August were read, approved and signed.


4 John Halkon introduced George Brown, known to many in Richmond, to talk on “Stories of the Career od a Book Representative.”


George spent 30 years in the book trade from 1974 when he was taken on by a new paperback publishing house, Futura, as their representative in the North East and Cumbria. He related stories of his experiences up to 1981. He worked with many different outlets as well as conventional bookshops, organized authors’ tours and book signings and attended authors’ conferences. Press and TV publicity were also part of his job. George recounted meeting many well known authors such as Dame Anna Neagle, Lena Kennedy (who gave him a role in one book), Coleen McCollough and John Cleese. He said it had been a dream job with plenty of comedy but also poignancy.


Questions touched on remainder books and going on-line to buy out of print publications.


In thanking him for a very enjoyable talk the Chairman commented that it was good to hear of nice celebrities.


5 Next Meeting –
Please be aware that there will be a slight change to our Speaker Programme on the 14th September next which is being arranged by Roger Bishop. The talk will now be entitled “Restoration and Operation of Iconic British Aircraft” and will be presented by Toni Hunter, Outreach Manager from Vulcan to the Sky Project.

---------------------------------------------------------------------

MINUTES OF 10 AUGUST 2016


1 Chairman Michael Larkman welcomed the 27 members present and Angela Dickinson. There were 9 apologies.

2 A minute’s silence was held in memory of ex member Peter Hide who died earlier in the week.

3 The Chairman again appealed for members to volunteer to take up the roles of Treasurer and Lunch Organisers.

4 August birthdays were announced – Les Joplin 94, John Ashton 80, John Harland 78, Chris Robinson 74 and Trevor Thurlow 62.

5 It was announced on behalf of Robert Riddell that the collection of milk bottle tops is currently suspended due to distribution problems in the Gambia.

6 The minutes of 27 July were read, approved and signed.

7 Trevor Thurlow “Kanchenjunga – Peak of the Five Great Treasures of the Snows”

Trevor explained how he became “passionate about the outdoors” despite a childhood fear of heights. He started in the Peaks, Dales and the Lake District but under the inspiration of the Swaledale Outdoor Club he moved on to Scotland and the Alps. A trek to the Himalayas began to be planned in 2013 and was undertaken in November 2014. Kanchenjunga is the world’s 3rd highest peak and is in eastern Nepal and is less trekked to than other mountains. The renowned climber Alan Hinckes believes it to be the hardest of the 14 8,000 metre peaks. With superb photos Trevor told the story of walking for 21 days to base camp at 17,500 feet. He praised the porters and spoke of the unexpected high levels of cultivation and the importance of schools to the Nepalis. River crossings were always dramatic but only one member of the party had a problem with altitude sickness. Base camp had stunning views of the mountain, making the hard work of the trek immensely rewarding.

Questions were: where next? (Kenya and New Zealand), problems with photography in the cold, the speaking of English by the population and the pros and cons of organized trips as against self-guidng.

Thanks were given by the Chairman and John Dickinson as the club’s own specialist on Nepal. All agreed it had been a wonderful presentation

8 Next Meeting: Weds 24 August – John Halkon “Stories of the Career of a Book Representative by George Brown”

................................................................................................



MINUTES OF 27 JULY 2016


1 Chairman Michael Larkman (who was welcomed back after a spell of ill health) welcomed the 24 members present. There 8 apologies.


2 It was reported that Peter Hide is in hospital and Stephen Harwood is still under treatment.


3 The Chairman again made a request to members to volunteer to take over as Treasurer and man the Lunch sub committee, pointing out that it is vital for the success of the club to fill these posts. The Christmas Lunch has been arranged but this will be the final effort by Ian Dawson.


4 The minutes of 13 July were read, approved and signed.


5 Bev Joicey introduced Beth Dawson and Sue Palin to talk on “The Richmond Citizens’ Advice Bureau.”

They said CABs have been around since the 1920s and that locally Richmondshire, Hambleton and Selby form one organization with over 90 volunteers. There is a national governance and organisational structure for the charity. They explained the wide range of issues on which they can give advice –especially financial, legal, welfare and employment. Advice can range from answering questions to passing clients onto other organisations better placed to help. As an example of their work a detailed account was given of the local “Warm and Well” scheme which is designed to combat fuel poverty, which is a significant problem in our area. In this the CAB works in partnership with 29 other organisations.  Beth and Sue provided a number of leaflets including volunteer packs.

Questions and comments followed on defining ‘available income’, how to give up the winter fuel allowance, sources of funding, language problems, the shortage of volunteers and relationships with government departments regarding policy formation.

In thanking the ladies Bev appealed to members to consider volunteering and Michael said the talk had been a real ’eye opener’.

6 The Chairman reminded the committee of the meeting at 10am on 28 September and informed the members that the next meeting would be on 10 August with Trevor Thurlow speaking on “Kanchenjunga – Peak of the Five Great Treasures of the Snows”.

........................................................................


MINUTES OF 13 JULY 2016

1 In the absence of Chairman Michael Larkman (who is recovering and hopes to be at the next meeting) Bev Joicey welcomed the 21 members present. There were 11 apologies for absence.

2 The Secretary explained that the expected curtaining off of the doorway in the top room had not been done due to the curtains having vanished. The officers had been in discussion with the cricket club to explore the possible use of the digital projector in the lower room.

3 July’s birthdays were announced – Roy Cross (Hon) 89, Harry Hodgkiss 88, Ken Stephens 80, Alec Butler 75 and Chris Woodard 72.

4 The minutes of 22 June were read, approved and signed, subject to correcting Henry VII’s wife name to Elizabeth, not Anne, of York.

5 Michael Gauntlett conducted a quiz with 61 questions on the 1960s which was enjoyed with considerable furrowing of brows, much humour and only a modicum of cheating about which the Acting Chairman showed no guilt. He did however thank Michael for his work in preparing and conducting the quiz and providing a number of prizes.


6 Next meeting – Weds 27 July – Bev Joicey introducing Carol Shreve speaking on “The Richmond Citizens’ Advice Bureau.”

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

MINUTES OF MEETING OF 22 JUNE 2016


1 In the absence of Chairman Michael Larkman in hospital Bev Joicey chaired the meeting and welcomed the 21 members present. There were no guests and 14 apologies.


2 Bev then reported that, as the proposed trip to York had only been supported by 18 people, he was inclined to cancel it. Later in the meeting it was agreed to try to go ahead with members driving their own cars rather than hiring a coach.


3 The minutes of 8 June were read, agreed and signed. There were no matters arising.


4 Ken Stephens “A Genealogical Approach”


Ken explained the causes and consequences of the Wars of the Roses in the late Middle Ages through displaying genealogical tables of the succession of the Plantagenet Kings and their rivals and their eventual loss of the English throne to the Tudors. The red rose of the House of Lancaster originated in France and the House of York adopted the white rose as a symbol of the purity of Constance, daughter of the Duke. However the wars were not so called until 1829.

The 2 Houses began with two of the sons of Edward III who became rivals for power after the death of Richard II in 1399. Henry of Lancaster, son of John of Gaunt, in effect seized the throne as Henry IV, although a better legal case was held through Phillippa from the line of his uncle Lionel, Duke of Clarence. The Lancastrian hold was maintained until the succession of the young and feeble Henry VI which led Richard Duke of York to attempt insurrection. His son then took the throne by force and became Edward IV. His unexpected death in 1483 brought his brother to power as Richard III, albeit in murky circumstances, such as the deaths of the Princes in the Tower, which are still argued over to this day.

The battle of Bosworth two years later saw Henry Tudor, who also had a rather distant claim to the throne, succeed as Henry VII. He set out to end the dispute and acquire extra legitimacy by marrying Anne of York. His own son Henry VIII made sure that the Clarence family hopes were finally ended by disposing of their 2 last claimants.

5 Next Meeting – Weds 13 July – 1960s Quiz by Michael Gauntlett



.......................................................................................................


MINUTES OF 8 JUNE 2016


1 Chairman Michael Larkman welcomed the 25 members present and the guest speaker Aron McCartney. There were 9 apologies for absence. He thanked Michael Walton for the last meeting’s talk and apologised for not doing so at the time.


2 A minute’s silence was observed in memory of member Keith Jackson who had died the previous week. The club will be well represented at the funeral. It was reported that Stephen Harwood will be unable to attend for a number of weeks due to illness but would welcome visitors. John Ward is about to start a course of treatment.


3 Trip organiser Bev Joicey announced that a sheet was being circulated for members to sign up for the visit to York Art Gallery in July.


4 Junes birthdays were announced – John Brennan (Hon member) 92, Geoffrey Hope 81, John Horseman 81, Michael Gauntlett 76, Stephen Harwood 72, Frances Rose 69, Roger Frier 69 and Richard Wright 68.


5  Ian Dawson agreed to further liaison with the cricket club as to our meeting room.


6 The minutes from 25 May were read, agreed and signed.


7 Geoffrey Hope and Aron McCartney Sculpture and Metal Casting”


The complex and challenging world of creating sculptures by metal casting was revealed. Geoffrey took up the art before retiring and Aron runs a professional foundry in Barnard Castle. Both paid tribute to their mentor, the late Sally Arrup. They demonstrated their skills by telling how they made a bronze bust of Geoffrey’s daughter Susannah in 2015. The use of a wide variety of materials, tools and processes was explained and illustrated. A great deal of time and patience are clearly required in moving from an idea to fruition. Inspiration has been drawn from the likes of Henry Moore, Elizabeth Frink and Auguste Rodin. They put on display many examples of their work including one of the 2 busts made of Susannah. Rarely can the snooker table have hosted such a show. In thanking Geoffrey and Aron for the talk Chairman Michael Larkman clearly spoke for everyone when he said he had been “incredibly impressed.”


8 Next meeting – Weds 22 June – Ken Stephenson on “A Genealogical Approach”

..................................................................................................................................

MINUTES 25 MAY 2016


1 Chairman Michael Larkman welcomed the 29 members present and Phillip Harvey’s guest Brian Thomas on his second meeting. He was then approved as a member. Roman Pronyszyn was a guest of Nigel Copestake. There were 4 apologies.


2 It was reported that John Ashton told the chairman that he is “surviving” and Geoffrey Hope will be seeing Keith Jackson soon.


3 We are likely to meet in the middle room until further notice as the cricket club have no current plans to replace the doors to the bar room.


4 Bev Joicey gave further details and asked for a show of hands for the proposed trip to York on 29 June.


5 The secretary read out a letter from Bill Gladstone accepting with pleasure his honorary membership.


6 Michael Walton spoke on “The Battle of Northallerton (The Battle of the Standard) on 22 August 1141.  He began by identifying the site which is behind the monument on the Northallerton – Darlington Road although it is hidden by a high hedge and has been inaccessible. Michael identified the main players as Matilda, daughter and heir of Henry I, her rival and cousin Stephen and her ally King David of Scotland. The conflict was part of the civil war between Matilda and Stephen to secure the English throne. David had extensive land holdings in England and was seeking to secure and extend these by allying with Matilda.  Stephen’s forces in the area were led by Archbishop Thurstan of York together with forces from Ripon and Beverley. Their 3 standards were placed together on a mast mounted on a cart; this gave the battle its name. The Scottish army was ill disciplined and a premature rush forward by the men of Galloway failed and quickly turned into a rout. It is estimated that they lost 10,000 dead and David lost his lands and power south of the border. The civil war eventually ended in 1167 when Matilda’s son became King Henry II and established firm control and began the Plantagenet line.


7 Next Meeting – Weds 8 June – Geoffrey Hope and Aaron McCartney on “Sculpture and Metal Casting”.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

MEETING - WEDNESDAY, MAY 11th

TALK BY ALAN LOMAX: "STARDUST INTERPRETED"

Accompanied by Ian Dawson on the projector, club member Alan Lomax described and played a large variety of jazz interpretations of the Hoagy Carmichael composition "Stardust". Dating from 1929, it is one of the most frequently recorded songs ever, with nearly every big name in the world of jazz producing an interpretation. We heard from Carmichael plus Louis Armstrong, the Hot Club of Paris, pianists Art Tatum, Fats Waller, Errol Garner and Dave Brubeck. Lionel Hampton, Paul Desmond, John Coltrane and Winton Marsallis offered other instrumental versions and vocals were provided by Sarah Vaughan.

The Chairman remarked on the fascinating contrast it had provided to Les Jobson at the last meeting, and he replied that he had known and featured jazz musicians during his career.

There was an explanation of time signature; mention of Richmand Jazz Festival in September; Carmichael's other careers as a singer and actor, and comments on the role of black people in the evolution of jazz.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

MINUTES OF MEETING 27 APRIL 2016 

1 Chairman Michael Larkman welcomed the 22 members present and Brian Thomas, guest of Phillip Harvey.  There were 10 apologies for absence. 

2 The meeting approved the proposal from the committee to confer Honorary Membership on Bill Gladstone. 

3 The minutes of 13 April were read, approved and signed. 

4 Bev Joicey as leader of the Visits Group, thanked those members who had agreed to help and outlined some possible trips. These are:

            York Art Gallery – an exhibition of World War I paintings

            Wreay Church – near Carlisle

            Alnwick Gardens

            Shandy Hall – at Coxwold with a tour led by curator  Patrick

            Wildgust

            Fairfax House – York - on a winter evening

No decision was required at this stage and the Secretary will circulate Bev’s paper of details by email, for members’ consideration. 

5 Les Jobson “A Strange Fascination – A Miscellany” 

            Les began by telling us that he was going to explain his “Strange Fascination” – a very personal matter – with the world of music on the stage by giving us songs, stories and memories. He had begun his interest as a child, inspired by his father’s talents on the piano and organ and as a choirmaster. Les concentrated on the period of the 1890s to the 1920s with his experiences in popular music, musicals, operettas and operas. His own career as a singer was cut short after he was no longer a boy soprano. He mentioned and performed his favourite pieces and spoke of personalities he had met.  In his inimitable, note less, style Les was informative, amusing and even touching as he concluded with some reflections on the role of pathos in his world.

            Thanking Les effusively the Chairman summed it up most succinctly with the words “what a memory!” 

6 Next Meeting – Weds 11 May – Alan Lomax “Stardust Interpreted”


            -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

MINUTES OF 13 APRIL 2016

COMMITTEE MEETING 

 1 Cheque signing – it was agreed that to simplify administration of the bank account Rule 8.2 should be amended to the effect that after “honorary secretary” it should read “and any other 2 members as agreed at the Annual General Meeting”. This change will be proposed at the AGM in November 2016. 

                                                                   Action – CR 

2 Membership – it was agreed that at the next meeting Bill Gladstone should be proposed for Honorary Membership. It was also agreed to propose full membership for David Heaton to today’s full meeting. In the light of some uncertainty about continued attendance (due to ill health) of Keith Jackson, Frank Faulkner, Fred Jary and David Whittaker (none of whom has yet renewed their subscription) no further action is currently appropriate. CR will supply full contact details of new members Simon Cherry and David Heaton to the committee. 

                                                                   Action – CR 

3 Visits – BJ gave an overview of his thoughts and fact finding to date on a number of possibilities and asked for feedback. He will build these into some more concrete proposals which he will circulate. TB offered to help with visits. 

                                                                   Action – BJ 

4 Rules Amendments – it had been expected that the newly agreed offering of invitations to ladies to attend full meetings and the recently adopted, simplified process for admitting new members might require changes to the Rules & Constitution. However when the current Rules were examined it was agree that neither new procedure required such a change.

TALK REPORT  

Member David Crane spoke about “A Memorial For Yearsley”.

It is a small village 6 miles east of Easingwold and the site of a tragedy in December 1943 when a Royal Canadian Air Force Lancaster bomber crashed in fog, killing 6 of the crew of 7. It was returning from a raid on Berlin and was 1 of 43 planes lost that night. Their graves are in Stonefall CWG Cemetery in Harrogate. The survivor, Gordon Fortier died in 2004.  Our guest David Smith had led a campaign to place a memorial to the crew in Yearsley Church and had been amazed at the support from locals and Canada. The dedication service was held on 8 May 2011, attended by many relatives visiting from Canada. David concluded with the moving story of crewmember Robert Marx’s fiancée, Edna.

          Questions followed on the numbers killed that night, the possible cause of the plane flying too low, the scandal that Bomber Command have only recently had a proper, national memorial and engines in Lancasters. The Chairman thanked David for a wonderful and moving story featuring real individuals.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

MINUTES OF 9 MARCH 2016 

1 Chairman Michael Larkman welcomed the 33 members present and the guest speaker Marion Moverley. There were 7 apologies. He added that we were represented in the latest Probus magazine and said members could make contributions provided a copy was given to the Secretary. 

2 Lunch numbers for after the meeting were collected and Steven Charlton said it was possible for anyone still wishing to attend the Spring Lunch to make arrangements with him before the end of the meeting. 

3 Welfare – Colin Chitty is scheduled for some surgery, John Ashton is now home and John Brennand s settled at Nightingale House. 

4 Membership – Simon Cherry was approved as a new member, Ken Wynn has resigned and an application has been received from David Heaton. 

5 March Birthdays – Tom Walter 83, Tony Baker 78, John Dickinson 76 and Ian Hughes 67. 

6 Roger Frier gave details of a meeting at Richmond Lower School on 22 March aimed at securing the future of the building. 

7 Minutes – of 24 February – were read, approved and signed, with thanks to Alan Lomax for deputizing for the Secretary. 

8 Next Meetings – Spring Lunch 23 March (12 noon King’s Head)

                             -13 April, David Crane “A Memorial For Yearsley” 

9 John Harland introduced local historian Marion Moverley to speak on “Being Sick in Mind and Body – A Look at Life Through Peoples’ Wills’ 

Marion characterized will making as being ‘sick in body but perfect in remembrance’. As wills become public after probate there are thousands available for historians to research and they are not morbid but full of fascination. Marion has specialized in wills before 1858 when legal responsibility moved from Church to State. These older wills are full of religious protocols and instructions for the care of souls. They reveal details of property values, illegitimacy, migration, social status and occupations. They give clues to constructing family trees and show it was normal for widows to lose their inheritance if they remarried. Many charities began with a bequest.

Questions and comments included the status of word of mouth wills, public access, long winded legal disputes, the secrecy of Royal wills and the role of executors. On this latter Marion gave cautionary advice: when making a will chose executors likely to be alive when you die.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Minutes of the Ordinary Meeting

24th February 2016

 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 

1.      Welcome, Apologies and Guests.   Chairman Michael Larkman welcomed all present including Simon Cherry, guest of Nigel Copestake and  John Dickinson’s guest David Heaton. 

2.      Membership Application by Simon Cherry has been received. 

3.      Welfare.   John Harland reported that John Ashton was in hospital with pneumonia and Geoffrey Hope reported that Keith Jackson was quite poorly at home and Geoff Robinson would keep in touch. 

4.      Announcement by John Dickinson.   John spoke of the book he has recently written entitled  “Yak in the Fridge”  He left information for any member who may wish to purchase this. The Secretary had agreed to  circulate details to members with email. 

5.      The Minutes of the meeting of 10th February were read, approved and signed.

Matters Arising:  Geoff Robinson enquired whether female guests being invited to attend meetings would require an amendment to the Constitution.   This would be brought before the committee.  

6.      Any Other Business.  There was no other business. 

7.      The Chair invited our own member Richard Wright to speak on the subject “The P2 Project bringing steam back to the main line” 

Richard announced himself as a Founder Member and Works Guide of the Project in Darlington. This had built the “Tornado” , an A1 steam locomotive in old LNER speak. P2 locos were originally required for more challenging routes eg Edinburgh to Aberdeen, hence the 2-8-2 wheel arrangement. Richard went through the development of the class and then explained  the setting up and funding of the building project. This seems to be benefitting from the success of the “Tornado” and latterly “The Flying Scotsman.” It will require £5 million and Richard gave details of how the public can subscribe. In the future there are hopes for other builds, perhaps of other models designed by Nigel Gresley. 

8.      Next  Meetings:

          1. 9th March John Harland introducing Marion Moverley speaking on “Being Sick in Mind and Body” a look at life through peoples’ wills

          2. 23rd March.  No meeting  Spring Lunch at The Kings Head 12 noon for 12.30

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

MINUTES OF MEETING OF 10 FEBRUARY 2016


1 Chairman Michael Larkman welcomed the 33 members present and Roger Frier’s guest Roman Pronyszyn. There were 4 apologies.

2 It was reported that John Brennand is now resident in Nightingale Hall, Richmond.

3 The application for membership by Tony Orton was approved nem con.

4 February birthdays were announced – Geoff Robinson (80) and Keith Robson (79).

5 Spring Lunch menu choices and cheques should be given to Steve Charlton by the latest on 9 March.

6 The minutes of 27 January were read, approved and signed.

7 It was agreed that future ‘marketing’ eg in Richmond What’s On should make it clear that members of the public wishing to attend a meeting should first enquire through the secretary.

8 It was agreed without dissent that ladies were welcome to attend provided that they are guests of members.

9 The Treasurer Ian Dawson reminded members that today was the last for payment of annual subscriptions.

10 Ian Hughes - “On the Bottle”

Ian said he was not really a collector but nonetheless had acquired many examples. He defined a bottle – narrow neck and sealable mouth – as opposed to jugs, flasks and flagons. He traced the origin of the word to Norman French although such containers were known to the Ancient Greeks (amphora) and were mentioned in the Bible. Glass was used by the Romans for perfume but it was the 18th century when the pattern known to us really emerged. He passed around examples including ‘coffins’  (for gin), stoneware (beer), and Codd bottles (used inverted with marble stoppers). Russell and Croft were a well known local manufacturer and there were several companies in Darlington. Colourings, labellings and various forms of stoppers were explained. Ian was clearly pleased that although plastic was now widespread glass remained supreme for wine and spirits. Questions were asked about names given to large bottles for champagne, such as jereboams, the difference between bottle blowing and moulding and the fusing on of collars. Ian was thanked by Michael Larkman.

11 Next meeting – 24 February, Richard Wright on “The P2 Project – New Steam For The Main Line.”

-----------------------------------------------------

MINUTES OF MEETING OF 13 JANUARY 2016

1 Chairman Michael Larkin welcomed the 35 members present. There were 6 apologies and one guest, Robert Longridge (Geoff Robinson).

2 Welfare – Tom Shovlin is recovering from surgery, John Ward will be absent for a few weeks after treatment and both Frank Faulkner and Fred Jary are well but unable to attend at present.

3 Minutes (25 November) were taken as read but are available on the web site.

4 Treasurer – Ian Dawson asked for the £25 subs to be paid on or before the next meeting.

5 Lunches – after discussion it was decided by a large majority to return to Catterick Golf Club for the next Christmas lunch (hopefully on December 14th). The Chairman thanked Steve and Carol Charlton for all their hard work in arranging the 2015 lunch. Ian said the menu etc for the Spring Lunch at the King’s Head on 23 March would be circulated soon.

6 Probus national magazine – the first issue from our new subscription was available to take away.

7 Membership – Michael appealed for all members to try to recruit new blood and to consider volunteering for committee vacancies. These are to replace Steve after the Spring lunch, to join Bev on the Trips Committee and to be Treasurer when Ian retires in November.

8 January Birthdays – Frank Faulkner (98), Bob Burrell Cory (85), Michael Larkman (81), John Deighton (78), Chris Donnison (71), Colin Chitty (69) and Ken Wynn (68).

9 Bob Burrell Cory showed a film on “A Century in Sunderland.”  This was a mixture of film, photos and interviews with residents. The approach was chronological and focused on social, economic, cultural and sporting aspects of the city’s history over the last 100 years or so. The amount of change in the period was enormous but throughout Sunderland’s people have shown great resilience and enterprise. Bob concluded with some personal memories of living in the city during the Second World War. He was thanked by the Chairman for providing such a fascinating slice of history.

10 Next Meeting – 27 January. John Deighton on “Return to Morocco.”

--------------------------------------------------------


MINUTES OF MEETING 25 NOVEMBER 2015


1 Members were reminded that today is the last for payment and menu choices for the Christmas Lunch and 6 signed up for lunch afterwards at the Black Lion.


2 New Chairman Michael Larkman welcomed the 30 members present and guest Tony Orton (Bev Joicey.)There were 5 apologies.


3 Bev Joicey offered to join any new Trips Committee and the Chair asked for other volunteers.


4 The minutes of 11 November were read, approved and signed.


5 Phillip Harvey spoke on “Amberdale; the Smallest Village.”


Amberdale is a model creation of only 40 square feet which Phiilip began making and filming in 1959. It is set in the peaceful, quiet setting of a dale in 1895 and has been constructed from materials such as paper, card and watercolours. If that suggests amateurishness or the mundane, nothing could be further from the truth. In a fraction short of an hour Phillip took us on an extraordinary trip around his stunning creation. He used still and video photography, poetry and wry humour to great effect to illustrate villages and towns, farms and mills, wild and domestic flora and fauna and railways and horse drawn traffic. His Amberdale is full of fascinating people engaged in their everyday lives and the depiction was what members recognized as the world of our grandparents.

Questions were asked about any recording (Phillip has a 1.5 hour DVD), what he had envisaged he would create when starting out, the scale (6’ to 1 “), how many locomotives there are (19) and the use of computer enhancement.

In thanking Phillip the Chairman simply spoke for all with 2 words, “fantastic” and “unbelievable”.


6 Next meetings: 9 December Christmas Lunch (Catterick GC)

13 January Bob Burrell Cory (Cricket Club)



------------------------------------------

MINUTES OF 35th ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING 

Wednesday 11 November 2015 

1 Chairman Tony Baker welcomed the 32 members present, and Simon Cherry (guest of Nigel Copestake). There were 4 apologies. 

2 The minutes of the 2014 AGM were read, approved and signed. 

3 Treasurer Ian Dawson presented the annual accounts ending 30 September:

INCOME 

Subscriptions - £1610 was collected, of which £970 was paid to the Cricket Club for Social Membership and Room hire.

When we set the subscription one year ago we were expecting room charges to be £40 per meeting.  It was subsequently agreed that if we made use of the restaurant following our meetings this would be reduced to £20. Some room charges were paid at each rate. If we had paid all at the higher rate (as we budgeted) this would have been an additional £400. 

Spring Lunch – made a Surplus of £10. 

EXPENDITURE 

 Christmas Lunch.  This cost £49.71 from club funds – mostly the cost of the raffle prizes. 

BBC Trip – We made a loss of £68 due to half the party missing the trip due to delays caused by traffic accidents.  We decided to repay the cost of the tour (but not the coach costs) to those affected, from club funds. 

Administration costs were £79.84 and the website charges were £68.91. 

SURPLUS FOR YEAR 

This was £383.66.  If we had made the budgeted payments to the Cricket Club the result would have been a small loss of £16.34. 

BALANCE in the bank at the end of the year was £1084.23. 

4 It was proposed that the annual subscription for 2015-16 should be set at £25 (less £10 for those who are independently members of the cricket club.) This may have to be reviewed if the cricket club altered its prescription payments.

At the Club’s AGM new Chairman, Michael Larkman was installed with Bev Joicey as the new Vice Chair. 

          .......................................................................

MINUTES OF ORDINARY MEETING 11 NOVEMBER 2015 

1 The meeting followed the 35th AGM during which the Chairman welcomed those present and a guest, Simon Cherry (Nigel Copestake). 

2 Deidre, widow of David Clark, is now at Nightingale Hall. 

3 November birthdays – Alan Earle (81) and Tom Shovlin (82). 

4 Following a brief explanation of the origin of “The Last Post” by Bob Burrell Cory and the Lawrence Binyon ‘Exhortation’ recited by Les Jobson, a minute’s silence was observed for Remembrance Day. 

5 John Ashton introduced the day’s speaker, his brother Phillip, a retired accountant and non-executive Director of the York NHS Trust. The talk was entitled “The Current State of the NHS.”

Mr Ashton said that there are many serious financial problems facing the Health Service but that there are possible solutions if politicians and voters are prepared to tackle the issues. He explained the role of the new Clinical Commissioning Groups now controlling the purchase of health care following the reforms of Andrew Lansley. Many of these are run by GPs without adequate financial expertise and have become unwieldy. In 2010 the NHS paid about £300 M to the Treasury but now has debts of several hundred millions. Half the anticipated debt for 2015-16 was reached in the first quarter. The problem is due to the tariff deflator system, increased pressure on A & E, use of Agency staff  and the ageing population. 75% of York’s beds are occupied by people over 75. There are also challenges posed by different approaches to care within health and social services (who are also under intense financial pressures.) The NHS workforce itself is aging rapidly and this will reach a crisis point in 5 years time. He was optimistic about the experiment in Manchester of devolving full financial control to the local managers and York is trying this out in 2 of its areas.

Questions followed on morale, new contracts, refunds from insurance companies and are there too many administrators. 

6 Next meeting – 25 November – Phillip Harvey on “Return to Amberdale, the Smallest Village.”

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

MINUTES OF ORDINARY MEETING 28 OCTOBER 2015

 1 After meeting lunches will revert to the Black Lion from the next meeting. Payment and menu choices for the Xmas lunch should be given to Steven Charlton by the next meeting. 

2 There were 30 members present and 3 apologies but no guests. 

3 The recent announcement of the death of Ralph Waggett was incorrect. Bob Burrell Cory is not well at present. 

4 The minutes of the last meeting were read, approved and signed. 

5 The Chairman is making arrangements for the club to be represented at the town Remembrance Day parade. 

6 Ken Wynn gave a brief explanation of the technicalities of using the cricket club TV for showing illustrations for talks and then gave his talk on “23 Years With White Van Man”.

Ken worked for many years for Northgate from its modest beginnings in Darlington and traced the company’s history to its place as the leading small van hire company in the UK. It has over 100,000 vehicles, 100 sites and 3000 employees both here and in Spain. The turnover is £600M per annum. He described common customer errors and their ways of misusing the vehicles. The financial development of Northgate has not always gone smoothly, including being taken over and surviving the financial crisis of 2008, which led to the shedding of 20,000 vehicles. He felt it had got too large and cumbersome although steps have been taken recently to address these issues. The company is now in a position to plan further expansion but it will not be plain sailing with potential problems such as reliance on diesel and uncertainty over interest rates. Question were asked about the involvement of Arriva, why always white (cheapness), Alan Noble, discounts from manufacturers (a close secret) and why Spain? 

7 Next meeting is 11 November with the AGM starting at the earlier time of 10.00 am

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

MINUTES OF ORDINARY MEETING 13 OCTOBER 2015

 

1 Chairman Tony Baker welcomed the 29 members present, the guest speaker (Anthony Wood) and Simon Cherry, guest of Nigel Copestake. There were 9 apologies. 

2 David Whittaker and Fred Jary are both in hospital following falls. The passing away of David Clark and Gerald Swainston was reported. 

3 October birthdays were given – John Ward (77), David Crane (76) and John Halkon (75). 

4 Reminders were given of the Western Front meeting on 28 October and the AGM on Nov 11. Ian Dawson reported he has circulated full details of the Christmas lunch and in his absence cheques and choices should be given to Steve Charlton or Alan Lomax. 

5 Following the decision of Phillip Crosse to retire as our auditor the Treasurer asked if any member was willing to take on the post. 

6 The minutes of 23 September were read, agreed and signed. 

7 Francis Rose introduced Anthony Wood to speak on: The History of MG Motors.” 

Anthony explained he has been a MG owner, driver, mechanic and racer since the age of 13. The cars, he said, were never complicated, always being based on what models Morris Motors (and its successors) were making at the time. MG stood for Morris Garages although the 2 companies ran separately. Their racing heyday was before the war but production cars were also manufactured. Anthony went through the evolution of the series of models with details of engine sizes, brake horse power, body styles and purchase prices. Production at the factory in Abingdon ceased during the war and when it resumed some 80% of the cars were exported to the USA. Things became difficult after MG became part of BMC and later British Leyland but their great success was the MG ‘B’  with over one quarter of a million made. Nevertheless the Company was wound down in 1980 although Rover produced the model F in 1994. Now owned by a Chinese firm cheap and cheerful cars are made at Longbridge and in China. 

Questions followed on the fabrics used on early models, the factory at Abingdon (which houses the MG Owners Club) , fuel injection, external handbrakes and the racing driver Goldie Gardener. 

In thanking Anthony for the talk the Chairman remarked that he had clearly got enough material for more talks and ought to return sometime. 

8 Next meeting – Weds 28 Oct Ken Wynn on “25 Years With White Van Man.”

--------------------


MINUTES OF ORDINARY MEETING OF 23 SEPTEMBER 2015 

1 Acting Chairman Michael Larkman welcomed the 24 members present and guests Dr Claire Shovlin (Tom Shovlin) and Bill Evans (David Crane). There were 10 apologies including the Chairman. 

2 Les Jobson is in hospital after a fall at home and Tom Walter will struggle to attend for some time. David Whittaker and John Dickinson offered to fill Tom’s slot on the new programme (27 April). 

3 The minutes of 9 September were read, approved and signed. 

4 The Committee are to meet on 14 October at 10.00. Any agenda items required should be conveyed to the Secretary. The AGM is due on Weds 11 November. Chris Robinson invited those interested in a trip to the Western Front to have a meeting at 10.00am on Weds 28 October. The next ordinary meeting is on Weds 14 October when Francis Rose will introduce Anthony Wood talking on “The History of MG Cars.” 

5 Tom Shovlin introduced his daughter Claire to speak on “DNA from Richard III to the NHS.” 

Dr Shovlin was educated at Richmond School and Jesus College Cambridge and currently works as a Consultant and Researcher at Imperial College and Hammersmith Hospital. 

Her interest in Richard III began on a visit to Bosworth Field and she started researching his family tree. This became integral to her scientific expertise with the discovery in 2012 of a body under a car park in Leicester and the tracing of DNA from the skeleton to 2 living descendants of the King’s sister Anne. The DNA gave a 99% certainty of it being Richard and helped lead to his subsequent re-burial in Leicester Cathedral.

Effective research in genetics had begun in the 19th century with the work of Gregor Mendel and Francis Dalton and eventually led in 1953 to the discoveries, such as the double helix of DNA, of Crick and Watson. There followed an explanation of the passing of genetic features down through the generations, the chromosomic differences between the sexes, and serious fatal diseases that can result when the transmission is in error. Other major discoveries were outlined such as the Human Genome Project and Alex Jefferies work on DNA ‘fingerprinting’, which has had a major impact on forensics and criminology. Much has been done (and is still on-going) into how DNA knowledge can help with the diagnosis and treatment of many major diseases. The NHS has recently set up the 100,000 Genome Project which has made the UK the envy of the rest of the world. 

Questions and comments followed on the Houston Project, the current descendants of Richard, the problems arising for obtaining medical insurance, genetic connections between Iceland and Ireland, the claims of Middleham as a better burial site for Richard, and how refreshing it had been to listen to such a skillful blending of science and humanities. 

The Acting Chairman thanked Dr Shovlin for a most stimulating and illuminating talk.

...........................................................................................................................

MINUTES OF ORDINARY MEETING OF 23 SEPTEMBER 2015 

1 Acting Chairman Michael Larkman welcomed the 24 members present and guests Dr Claire Shovlin (Tom Shovlin) and Bill Evans (David Crane). There were 10 apologies including the Chairman. 

2 Les Jobson is in hospital after a fall at home and Tom Walter will struggle to attend for some time. David Whittaker and John Dickinson offered to fill Tom’s slot on the new programme (27 April). 

3 The minutes of 9 September were read, approved and signed. 

4 The Committee are to meet on 14 October at 10.00. Any agenda items required should be conveyed to the Secretary. The AGM is due on Weds 11 November. Chris Robinson invited those interested in a trip to the Western Front to have a meeting at 10.00am on Weds 28 October. The next ordinary meeting is on Weds 14 October when Francis Rose will introduce Anthony Wood talking on “The History of MG Cars.” 

5 Tom Shovlin introduced his daughter Claire to speak on “DNA from Richard III to the NHS.” 

Dr Shovlin was educated at Richmond School and Jesus College Cambridge and currently works as a Consultant and Researcher at Imperial College and Hammersmith Hospital. 

Her interest in Richard III began on a visit to Bosworth Field and she started researching his family tree. This became integral to her scientific expertise with the discovery in 2012 of a body under a car park in Leicester and the tracing of DNA from the skeleton to 2 living descendants of the King’s sister Anne. The DNA gave a 99% certainty of it being Richard and helped lead to his subsequent re-burial in Leicester Cathedral.

Effective research in genetics had begun in the 19th century with the work of Gregor Mendel and Francis Dalton and eventually led in 1953 to the discoveries, such as the double helix of DNA, of Crick and Watson. There followed an explanation of the passing of genetic features down through the generations, the chromosomic differences between the sexes, and serious fatal diseases that can result when the transmission is in error. Other major discoveries were outlined such as the Human Genome Project and Alex Jefferies work on DNA ‘fingerprinting’, which has had a major impact on forensics and criminology. Much has been done (and is still on-going) into how DNA knowledge can help with the diagnosis and treatment of many major diseases. The NHS has recently set up the 100,000 Genome Project which has made the UK the envy of the rest of the world. 

Questions and comments followed on the Houston Project, the current descendants of Richard, the problems arising for obtaining medical insurance, genetic connections between Iceland and Ireland, the claims of Middleham as a better burial site for Richard, and how refreshing it had been to listen to such a skillful blending of science and humanities. 

The Acting Chairman thanked Dr Shovlin for a most stimulating and illuminating talk.

....................................

MINUTES OF ORDINARY MEETING 26 AUGUST 2015

 1 Acting Chairman Michael Larkman welcomed the 36 members present. There were no guests but 6 apologies for absence.

 

2 Nigel Copestake invited members to join him and the speaker for a post meeting lunch at Rustique.

 

3 The vote was held on the proposal that the club should take part in civic events. The result, scrutinized by Peter Clarke and Stephen Charlton, was 25 in favour and 9 against. The committee will now consider what to do next.

 

4 The national Probus magazine is free but postage has to be paid. The next step will also be considered by the committee as there was a large display of member interest.

 

5 The proposed trip to York will not take place due to insufficient interest.

 

6 Ian Dawson offered to liaise with the new caterers at the cricket club with a view to providing lunches after meetings. He also reminded members that the Christmas lunch will be on 9 December at Catterick Golf Club.

 

7 The minutes of 12 August were read, agreed and signed. There were no matters arising.

 

8 Nigel Copestake introduced the day’s speaker, Professor John Derry, on his return to us, speaking on “1914 – Unreal Expectations and Flawed Strategies.”

 

Professor Derry began by saying that many in 1914 expected a very different war from that which ensued. In Britain Haig and Kitchener were minority voices forecasting a long conflict, not one that would be over by Christmas. This would require a vastly expanded BEF. He then explained that little had been learned from such as the American Civil War and the Russo-Japanese War (1904-5). He surveyed plans and expectations in each of the main combatant nations, such as Germany’s flawed Schlieffen Plan, Austria Hungary’s determination to crush Serbia, France’s obsession with aggression and Britain’s concerns about being involved in a grim land war whilst protecting the Royal Navy. Much European thinking derived from the absence of a major war since the defeat of Napoleon in 1815. There was limited understanding that the coming conflict would be total war, drawing in civilians on an unprecedented scale. He suggested that Austria Hungary, egged on by the Chief of Staff Conrad, was just as much the cause of war as Germany, due to their terror of a Slav led disintegration of their multi ethnic empire.

 

Questions touched on details of the assassination of Franz Ferdinand on 28 July, whether Austria would have engineered another casus belli anyway, and the presence (or not) of tuberculosis and syphilis in some of the leading players.

 

In thanking Professor Derry, Michael Larkman simply said “please come again”.

 

9 Next meeting – 9 September with Ray Sheahan speaking on “The Long and Winding Road to Invention’.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

MINUTES OF ORDINARY MEETING 12 AUGUST 2015

 

1 Chairman Tony Baker welcomed the 28 members present. There were 9 apologies and no guests.

 

2 August birthdays were reported for Les Jobson, John Ashton, John Harland, Chris Robinson and Trevor Thurlow.

 

3 A board was circulated for members to sign up for a trip to York on 16 September. The Chairman noted that the recent national Probus magazine mentioned that Nissan are open to visits but it was also reported that these are not possible until January. The Chairman agreed to investigate getting copies of this magazine on a regular basis.

 

4 As the cricket club now seem to have some catering availability Stephen Charlton and Ian Dawson will investigate.

 

5 The secretary reminded everyone of the ballot to be held on 26 August regarding the club being represented at civic events. The only financial implication seemed to be the cost of a wreath on Remembrance Day.

 

6 The minutes of 22 July were read, approved and signed. There were no matters arising.

 

7 Copies of the up-dated programme (until the AGM in November) had been emailed by Geoff Robinson who had also provided paper copies.

 

8 The speaker for the day – Stephen Harwood introduced Robert Hillary to talk on Raby Castle. Robert is a stalwart of Darlington Lions and Probus as well as a guide at Raby.

 

Robert’s talk was in 2 parts, a brief history and a virtual guided tour via DVD with his own commentary. The settlement dates from Cnut (11th century), became the property of the influential Nevill (Yorkist) branch of the Plantagenets in the middle ages before passing to the Vanes in 1626. Although fully fortified it was spared much military damage and was turned into a sumptuous family home in the 18th century. It is the centre of a large landholding of thousands of acres, including High Force, and has a deer park, large formal gardens, and a coach museum. It is very much still the home of the family of Lord Barnard  and his potential successors and regularly houses special events, especially encouraging local young musicians. The DVD particularly displayed furniture, pottery and paintings as well as providing information on regular restorations.

 

In thanking Robert the Chairman expressed his view that it is good that such properties are preserved in this manner. Questions were asked about MPs from the family, the local cricket club, the running costs and Samuel Pepys witnessing the execution of Sir Henry Vane in 1662 for having been pro Cromwell.

 

9 Next meeting – 26 August with Nigel Copestake introducing Professor John Kerry talking on 1914.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

MINUTES OF THE ORDINARY MEETING OF 22 JULY 2015

1 Chairman Tony Baker welcomed the 26 members present and John Franklin, guest of Stephen Harwood. There were 6 apologies. It was reported that Bob Burrell Cory’s recent absences were due to other commitments, not ill health.

2 The meeting unanimously endorsed the Committee ‘s recommendation of Honorary Membership for John Brennand and Cedric Shaw.

3 Robert Riddell announced there was a clip board circulating for ideas for possible trips and planned to make a clear proposal at the next meeting.

4 Stephen Charlton invited members to join him at lunch in the Black Lion after the meeting. Ian Dawson reported that the Christmas Lunch will be held at Catterick Golf Club. Peter Clarke indicated that new catering staff had been appointed at the Cricket Club and Rotary had found this to be satisfactory.

5 Alan Lomax stated that the wall mounted TV set could now be used to project from a lap top via a HDML link.

6 Ken Stephens reported on his raffle prize tour of the A1M works at Scotch Corner and brought the contractor’s cheque for £89 for the Nepal relief charity. He distributed and explained their detailed maps of the entre project. Alan Lomax had found out that all the archeological artifacts recovered were to go to York by a decision Of English Heritage.

7 Michael Eyles introduced the speaker for the day, Gary Hudson, of Richmondshire Council’s Ground Services division. Gary described the wide scope of his responsibilities in an area of 500 square miles and a population of 50,000. His remit includes play parks, pest control, church yards, public toilets, car parks, trees and council land grass cutting. He gave details of some of the problems associated with these tasks and added that in the past the Council had won awards for aspects of this work but no longer applied because of the high bidding costs involved. 

Questions touched on (1) why there were no parking concessions for events which brought much needed tourist income, such as the Book Festival, and whether elected members had sufficient awareness of the importance of tourism to the town; (2) details of what trees required planning permission for felling and (3) if the parking wardens could be sent to charm school. Gary dealt with these deftly and in thanking him for a very informative talk the Chairman commended him for his bravery.

8 Next Meeting – Weds 8 August – Stephen Harwood introducing Robert Hillary on “Raby Castle”.

MINUTES OF ORDINARY MEETING OF 8 JULY 2015

1 Chairman Tony Baker welcomed the 28 members present. There were no guests and 4 apologies.

2 Details were given of the funeral of Joyce Gunton, widow of past member Bing. David Whittaker is having heart trouble. The funeral of Lawrence Barker was well attended with the Club well represented.

3 July birthdays were announced.

4 Robert Riddell said that a paper would be circulated soon requesting members’ suggestions for locations for a trip this summer/autumn (giving time for consultation with partners).

5 The minutes from the previous meeting were read, approved and signed.

6 Peter Clarke gave details of the Rotary Wine Tasting on 17 July.

7 Next Meeting – 22 July

8 Bev Joicey “A Very English Form of Art” ie “we are building a new world – Artists of the Great War.” Bev drew his first interest in these artists from visits from childhood to the Imperial War Museum and the gallery in the basement of the Banqueting Hall in Whitehall.  He realized that the work of these artists was the way that visual memories of the war brought colour into an otherwise black and white world. 25 Official War Artists were appointed, many of them trained at the Slade School of Art. Many were from public schools and steeped in ‘classical’ literature and of them gained experience of combat. Bev explored their sources of inspiration and idealisms and the ways each tried to make effective sense of their experiences, especially the emotional and sensory elements. The work of a selection of the artists was shown and explained, including Christopher Nevinson, Paul Nash, Muirhead Bone and Stanley Spenser (‘possibly the greatest war artist of all’. Paintings from several women were also shown, mainly, but not exclusively, of home front scenes.

Questions considered what was the exposure of the paintings to the wider public, how did the artists dealt with visual truth and the enormous amount of painting and drawing done by soldiers of all the combat nations. The Chairman’s thanks to Bev made reference to the evocative picture he had found on the cover of an official document.

_________________________________

MINUTES OF ORDINARY MEETING 24 JUNE 2015

1 Chairman Tony Baker welcomed the 35 members present. There were 6 apologies but no guests. A minute’s silence was held in respect of Lawrence Barker who passed away last week.

2 Robert Riddell asked if there were any more takers for the proposed trip on 9 July. There were none. As the uptake was now only 10, making coach hire uneconomic, the trip was therefore cancelled. Geoffrey Hope generously offered that if any member wished to accompany his own trip to the Henry Moore exhibition at the Yorkshire Sculpture Park they should let him know. In due course members will be asked to suggest venues for future trips.

3 Ken Stephens has fixed his prize visit to the A1 site and will endeavour to get some maps from the contractors. It was stated that a mediocre map is available on the Highways Agency web site.

4 The minutes of 10 June were read, approved and signed.

5 Speaker – Chris Woodard (definitely not Woodward, Woodhead, etc.) spoke on “And Now For Something Completely Different”. This was an amusing piece of autobiography, in lieu of a possible book. He began with his dramatic wartime birth – his mother being taken to maternity on a horse drawn milk float and returning home to bomb damage. Chris has always had trouble with officialdom getting his surname wrong but at school acquired a love of languages; he is bi-lingual in English and Welsh. He read out a number of funny school reports, for some of which he claimed to be the object. He has little respect for predictive texting, and much public signage, including dual language signs now mandatory in Wales. He is very widely travelled and recounted some of his odder experiences with languages, currencies and people. One highlight was making the acquaintance in a bar of Vaclav Havel, then President of Czechoslovakia. Finally Chris said he has lived for several years in Richmond which he described as “My Eldorado.”

6 Next meeting 8 July Bev Joicey.

MINUTES OF ORDINARY MEETING 10 JUNE 2015

1 Chairman Tony Baker welcomed the 34 members present. There were 4 apologies but no guests.

2 Peter Hide is unwell and has probably resigned form the club. John Brennan has written today to tender his resignation due to failing hearing and eyesight. The Chair will reply.

3 June birthdays were announced: John Brennan 91, Geoffrey Hope 80, John Horseman 80, Michael Gauntlett 75, Stephen Harwood 71, Roger Frier 68 and Richard Wright 67.

4 Ian Duncan announced that owing to Cricket currently having no chef there will be no after meeting lunches here until further notice.

5 Robert Riddell reported that the signing up board for the trip on 9 July to the Yorkshire Sculpture Park and Mining Museum was being circulated. The deadline is next meeting.

6 A raffle in aid of the Nepal earthquake relief raised £100 and was won by Ken Stephenson, with his prize being a day out on the A1 improvement site, courtesy of the contractors.

    7 The minutes of 27 May were read, approved and signed. It was suggested Ken and John Horseman should ask for maps and Ian said there was one available on the Highways Agency web site.

8 Peter Clarke invited members to the Rotary Club Wine Tasting at the cricket club at 7 for 7.30 on 17 July.

9 John Dickinson introduced his friend Laxmi Bantwana and together they explored the theme of “Meet a Gurkha”. 2015 represents 200 years of the Brigade of Gurkhas association with the British Army. They began with a brief geographical description of Nepal and its 3 main areas and habitats. The recruitment calendar was described with a greater emphasis today on education as well as physical aptitude. Once selected the recruits come to Catterick. Laxmi gave details of his time and travels in the army; he gained permanent rights to settle in the UK in 2005. He described his first impressions of the UK on arrival in 1979 and the importance of the educational opportunities given to his daughters. He now works as the Operations and Service Manager at Harewood House which he recommended for a visit. There were many questions which included why UK aid has got stuck in transit and how we could help solve the problem, the medals he was wearing (including the MBE), Nepali religions and the integration of retired Gurkhas into UK society. The Chairman thanked the 2 presenters for an excellent morning.

10 Next Meeting – Weds 24 June, Chris Woodard on “And Now For Something Completely Different.”

........................................

MINUTES OF ORDINARY MEETING 27 MAY 2015

 1 Acting Chairman Michael Larkman welcomed the 38 members present and Ian Black, the guest of Stephen Harwood.  There were 7 apologies for absence. 

2 John Deighton announced that with Gift Aid the Nepal collection at the previous meeting raised £100. Robert Riddell thanked those who had donated bottle tops for the Gambia. 

3 Robert reported that the proposed trip to the Sculpture Park and Mining Museum had encountered some problems which were being worked on. 

4. The minutes of 14 May were read, approved and signed. 

5. Michael Larkman and John Deighton explained that once the Committee had decided upon the appropriate wording a secret ballot will be held to determine if the Club should be represented at events such as Remembrance Day. 

6. Next Meeting: Weds 10 June – John Dickinson and Laxmi Bantawa on “Meet a Gurkha” 

7.  John Horseman introduced David Lowery (Project Director) and Stuart Culley (Public Liaison Officer) from the A1L2B contractors to explain the A1 Improvement Scheme.

.................................................................

David traced the history of the scheme from inception to delay and finally the start in March 2014. The contractors are Morgan Sindall and Carillion. He provided fascinating statistics to illustrate the scope of the scheme e.g. the cost is £376M of which construction costs £250M and delivery vehicles arrive or leave every 3 minutes. More than 90 landowners have been affected. The scheme is currently on target and budget. Great attention is paid to health and safety, wildlife and the environment and archeology (with many major discoveries). He explained the designs for the 3 sections with the central part, bypassing Catterick and crossing the Swale, being the most complex and has necessitated a new route, whereas much of the scheme involves improving the current carriageways. Stewart (Public Liaison Officer) gave details of the ways the engineers are relating to local communities, charities and other stakeholders.) Thanking the speakers Michael Larkman said he could only think of one word – ‘fascinating’.

________________________________________

MINUTES OF MEETING 13 MAY 2013 


1 Chairman Tony Baker welcomed the 28 members present. There were 11 apologies and no guests.

2 May’s birthdays were announced – Keith Jackson (85) Michael Walton (70) and Ray Sheahan (69). 3 Robert Riddell announced that it was proposed to run a visit to the Yorkshire Sculpture Park special Henry Moore exhibition and the Yorkshire Mining Museum, both near Wakefield. A show of hands indicated viability and the board for signing up was circulated.

4. Robert appealed for coloured milk bottle tops, urgently needed to assist numeracy education in the Gambia and John Dickinson announced that members could donate towards relief in Nepal.

5. The minutes of 22 April were read, approved and signed.

6 The next meeting was announced as Stewart Culley talking on the A1 Improvement Scheme on 27 May. (John Horseman)

7 The speaker for the day was introduced by Mike Bacon. Dr Paul Shelton, Assistant Dean of Science & Engineering at Teeside University, spoke on the university’s engagement with business. He had set out as a metallurgist working on turbine engines blades before joining Teeside University and described how it had begun and grown to serve the needs of local industry. This remains a powerful raison d’etre, helping it to win many accolades such as the THES University of the Year. The department runs an extraordinary range of academic and vocational courses, full time, part time, distance learning etc. Client industries include oil and gas, forensics and fire scenes, rail safety, and safety standards. Placements and internships play a big part in degree courses and students are taught management, business and entrepreneurial skills. Questions touched on overseas work, maintain standards and the sustainability (or not) of the current funding scheme for HE.

                                         

MINUTES OF THE MEETING OF 22 APRIL 2015 

1 The Chairman welcomed the 31 members present and the Secretary read out the 7 apologies. There were no guests but sadly Cedric Shaw announced that this would be his last meeting as he now found attendance to be too tiring. The meeting offered their best wishes. Phillip Harvey was welcomed back after his recent heart problems. 

2 Trips: the Secretary reported that he has written to the BBC as requested but has had no reply as yet. The Chairman said he has suggested a trip to the theatre in Keswick as a possibility and Geoffrey Hope described a recent visit to the Yorkshire Sculpture Park, also a possibility. The trips committee will consider these for a 2015 trip. 

3 The minutes of 8 April were read, approved and signed. 

4 Geoff Robinson announced that the Swaledale Festival needs a volunteer treasurer and Alan Lomax thanked and congratulated John Dickinson and Peter Clarke for running the excellent election hustings earlier in the week. 

5 Next Meeting: Weds 13 May with Mike Bacon introducing Dr Paul Shelton of Teeside University talking on “University Engagement With Business.” 

6 The day’s speaker was member Les Jobson reminiscing about his war time experiences.

In 1941 Les was an analyst with ICI and decided it was safer to use rather than manufacture aviation fuel. After the usual medicals, delays and training he found himself in Southern Rhodesia learning to be a navigator/bomb aimer/air gunner aka NBG! By 1943 he was night flying over the Irish Sea in Catalina flying boats. He described the pitfalls in landing and taking off on water and a long trip in 1944 to get to Ceylon. In early 1945 he transferred to Liberator bombers with many flights to Burma, Sumatra and Malaya dropping supplies and food to the locals and POW camps.  At age 24 he was eventually demobbed in 1946, having (in his own words) never got to fly in Bomber Command and never having been a hero. 

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

MINUTES OF MEETING ON 8 APRIL 2015

1 Chairman Tony Baker welcomed the 30 members present and noted the 10 apologies. He announced that Colin Williamson had resigned as a member.

2 Sadly Philip Harvey had had a second heart attack but was back home again.

3 April Birthdays were announced: Phillip Crosse 91, Philip Harvey 77, Bev Joicey 74, Peter Clarke 73, Bill Green 73 and Ian Dawson 71.

4 It was announced that Antonio had resigned as chef at the cricket club with Mike Hall replacing him. The club will soon be embarking on the next stage of alterations to the pavilion facilities.

 5 It was agreed that the secretary should write to the BBC to ask for compensation for their unwillingness to provide a late tour on our recent but delayed visit.

 6 It was clarified that the talk on 27 May (A1 alterations) would be at the normal morning time.

7 John Dickinson gave details of an election hustings arranged at Richmond School on 20 April, with questions to be submitted in advance to Peter Clarke.

8 The minutes of 11 March were read, approved (with a change re. the BBC from ‘unable’ to ‘unwilling’) and signed. There were no matters arising.

9 The next meeting (22 April) will feature Les Jobson due to the indisposition of Philip Harvey.  Les will talk about his contribution to the defeat of Hitler, or something like that.

10 The speaker, Sidney Fielden was introduced by Mike Gauntlett (resplendent in his MCC tie). Sidney is a retired CID officer and a Vice President of Yorkshire Cricket Club.

The talk was entitled “Reading From the Wrong Notebook”, the rationale for which became clear as he went along, producing many identical but illicit items of that ilk at irregular intervals. (Secretary to pause here for applause for his alliteration.) Sidney delivered a funny and illuminating series of anecdotes featuring his life a young policeman. Subjects included Royal Trains, point duty, overfamiliarity with senior and so called night magistrates, Justice James Pickles, Fred Trueman and the awkward squad otherwise known as spectators at Headingley. Plus of course reading from the wrong notebook.

The Chairman thanked Sidney for the entertainment and pointed out that his sort of policemen would not get on in today’s environment.

______________________________________

COMMITTEE MEETING 11-3-15

All present but with apology from Geoff Robinson. Tony Baker in the Chair. 

1. Civic Profile 
JD briefly reminded members of the issues as previously discussed and all then expressed their opinions. It was decided:
       *    no change needed to Chair’s job description
      *     Membership to be consulted by secret ballot prior to Mayor Making and Remembrance Day as to the Club being represented or not.
       *    Chair at the time to be free to decide on his participation or delegation to another officer (should the Club vote for representation).
        *    providing a wreath on 11/11 left open.
 
2. Xmas Lunch
 ID reviewed discussions to date with Antonio at the Cricket Club about the possibility of the Xmas Lunch being held there.  This was supported in principle by all and ID was asked to move forward with further discussions as to date, cost and menu.
 3. Membership 
CR asked if the members should be asked to approve Trevor Thurlow as a new member. Agreed unanimously. Colin Williamson’s resignation was noted and Ian Hughes was welcomed back as a member. No further action is needed re. Chris Payne’s resignation. 
4. Salford Trip 
CR explained that a motorway delay had resulted in one group not touring the BBC. ID proposed giving a refund from Club funds to those who had missed the tour and to those who had had to withdraw from the trip at the last minute. This was agreed by all. 

____________________

MINUTES OF THE MEETING OF 11th FEBRUARY 2015 

1 Chairman Tony Baker welcomed the 39 members present and Trevor Thurlow, the guest of John Deighton. 

2 It was reported that Bev Joicey had flu and was unable to give the day’s talk. Chris Robinson was standing in. 

3 February Birthdays were given – David Whittaker 90, Geoff Robinson 79 and Keith Robson 78. Chris Payne is 85 but has sent a letter of resignation, being unable to attend often, mainly due to his wife’s ill health. 

4 It was reported that everyone present had paid their subscriptions. 

5 There is still time to sign up (and pay) for the Spring Lunch and a very good number indicated their intention to stay for lunch after today’s meeting. 

6 Anyone still wishing to go on the trip to Salford and the BBC was urged to sign up by the end of the week. There are 7 vacancies for the BBC tour. The BBC rules state the need for photo identity, no bags and limited photo opportunities. Further information would be circulated in due course. 

7 The Minutes of 28th January, kindly compiled by Alan Lomax were read, approved and signed. There were no matters arising. 

8 John Horseman said he was having trouble in pinning down a firm date for a talk on the A1 development. It was suggested that Geoff Robinson could approach Bev Joicey to talk instead on 11 March. 

9 Next Meeting: 25 February with Bill Green introducing Adam Edmond on “A Virtual Tour of Foxglove Covert.”

10 “The Zulu War of 1879” Chris Robinson.

Chris outlined the development of Boer and British settlement in southern Africa and the appearance of the Zulus as a formidable military force. Tension increased in the early 1870s with a forward colonial policy shown by Benjamin Disraeli’s government and the aims of the High Commissioner, Bartle Frere, for Confederation. He provoked a war and an invasion began in January led by Lord Chelmsford. He fatally divided his force at Isandlwana and the main Zulu army killed over 1200 British soldiers. Later that day just over 100 soldiers held off repeated Zulu attacks on the hastily fortified outpost at Rorke’s Drift. Only 17 died and11 VCs were awarded. British reinforcements were provided and in a second invasion the Zulus were heavily beaten at Ulundi. King Cetswayo was captured and taken to London and his kingdom was split up. Zululand became part of the Union of South Africa in 1910.

______________________________

Minutes of the Ordinary Meeting
27th January 2015

1. Welcome  Chairman  Tony Baker  welcomed 32 members with 9 apologies. Tony also welcomed our new member, Roger  Bishop. 

2. Sickness Reports   There was nothing to report.  

3. Annual Subscriptions The Treasurer reported there were a small number of subscriptions owing and requested they be paid as soon as possible. 
4. Programme Update   Geoffrey Robinson, our Speaker Secretary, stated the new Speaker Programme had been issued by email and that hard copies were available at today’s meeting. 
5. Salford Trip – Monday, 2nd March   Robert Riddell announced details of the visit.  The list for the tour of the BBC was getting quite full so people who wished to go on this tour should contact him before the end of the meeting. 
6. Richmond Civic Society  The Probus Club  had received the Annual Programme from the Civic Society as a part of sharing information. 
7. The Minutes of the Meeting on January 14th were read, approved and signed. There were no matters arising. 
8. Any Other Business   There was no other business. 
9. The Chair invited Keith Robson to introduce his guest, Dave Reed, who spoke on “Another Market Town” (Towcester).   Dave preceded his talk with one or two jokes, then continued with a brief history of the oldest town in Hertfordshire.  The prehistoric and Roman finds seems to suggest Towcester as a trading centre with connections throughout the land.   A prehistoric axe that had come from Langdale in the Lake District and Roman coins from different parts of the country were excavated  in this area.   A roman legion from Germany was based here and a petrifying stream dating from pre-Roman times, now culverted, was used for healing purposes and is said never to run dry. 

In the 13th century the rector of the church eventually became Pope Boniface the 8th and Archdeacon Sponne established the Grammar School. 

The Vikings arrived approximately 900AD and Danelaw was established. In Medieval times the Doomsday Book stated it was a wooded area with a mill and mott and bailey castle.  Near St. Laurence’s church was a pillory, ducking stool and stocks.  

In Tudor times Sir Richard Empson became Vice Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and on Henry VII’s death  Sir Richard, as Vice Chancellor had made England the wealthiest it had ever been.   However, Sir Richard was eventually executed by Henry the VIII.   

During the Stuart period the area was split by the Civil War – Northamptonshire being Parliamentarian and Oxfordshire being Royalist.  Prince Rupert fortified Towcester as a garrison for the Royalists but eventually Fairfax made the town his HQ for the Parliamentarians.  Towcester backed both sides. 

In Georgian times travel was improving, turnpikes opened, Watling Street developed and Towcester was the cross roads of the main thoroughfares.  27 coaches per day stopped at Towcester so you could say it was the centre of trade and population expansion. 
The Victorian period brought railways but the city fathers tried unsuccessfully to stop the railway to protect their monopoly of the main routes of trade and commerce. 

After one or two more jokes, Dave then showed a photographic tour of some of the interesting architecture and nooks and crannies of this ancient market town. 

10. Next Meeting – Wednesday 11th February.   When the speaker will Bev Joicey on “A Very English Form of Art”

                                                                


NOTES FROM COMMITTEE MEETING 

14th January 2015 

1 All present with apology from Michael Gauntlett 

2 Raising the civic profile of the club – John Deighton explained his idea that Probus be represented formally at certain civic events eg Remembrance Day and Mayor Making, and also the value of more precise job descriptions for members of the committee.  Other ideas were put forward such as setting out the raisons d’etre of Richmond Probus, allowing the Chairman of the day to decide which (if any) event to attend and consulting the members (possibly through a secret ballot) on any event liable to be contentious. It was agreed to think this through before making a decision at the next meeting. 

3 Civic Society – it was agreed that we would exchange programmes with them on a regular basis.              Action – CR 

4 Leisure Trust – it was agreed we could not support their fund raising for a mini golf facility.                                                Action – CR 

5 New Member – it was agreed to invite the members to accept Roger Bishop as a new member.                                  Action – CR 

6 Roy Cross – it was reported by Chris Robinson that Roy had accepted the invitation to become an Honorary Member. 

7 Christmas Lunch – Ian Dawson sought guidance on possible menus for the 2015 Xmas Lunch. After discussion it was agreed that there were 2 potential venues, the Kings Head and the Cricket Club. ID is to consult Antonio in detail about what Cricket could offer. Members would be consulted, possibly after the March Lunch.                                                                        Action – ID 

8 Next Meeting – 10.15 Weds 28 January

--------------------------------- 

For the first meeting of 2015, member Stephen Charlton introduced John Watson, a naturalist, active in outdoor activities to talk about 

“The Border Reivers” 

John gave an entertaining historical review, often tinged with black humour. The Reivers, who were a dastardly bunch, were active on both sides of the Anglo Scottish border from the mid 13th to the 17th centuries. Totally lawless, except in certain specific ways between themselves, they gave allegiance only to their family band and ignored the 2 nations and the legal border. John gave details of their methods (nasty), their weapons (nastier still) and their ruthlessness (even nastier). He named the worst culprits, explained the origin of the words ‘blackmail’ and ‘bereavement’ and recounted how indirectly a reiver helped defeat the Spanish Armada. He recommended George MacDonald Fraser’s book “The Steel Bonnet”. 

In thanking John, the Chairman said he must come back again and tell us the stories for which he had had no time 

_____________________________

REPORT ON MEETING ON 10 DECEMBER 2014

1 Welcome: Chairman Tony Baker welcomed the 36 members present and guest Roger Bishop (on his second visit). There were 7 apologies. He also welcomed the new blinds at the windows. 

2 Lunches: after reminding the members that they should immediately sign up for today’s lunch if they has not already done so, Steven Charlton reported that numbers for next week’s Christmas Lunch were at 78 and all was duly arranged. 

3 David Bradford: a brief silence was held in memory of ex member David who recently died in New Zealand. 

4 Welfare: Alec Butler has a chest infection, hopefully only temporarily. 

5 Annual Subscriptions: Ian Duncan reminded members that £30 subs (£20 for those who are cricket members) are due by the end of January. 

6 March Trip: Chris Robinson asked for members to sign up on the list provided for the visit to Salford and the BBC on 2 March. 

7 December Birthdays: Mike Bacon (80), Nigel Copestake (76) and Steven Charlton (63). 

8 Minutes (of 26 November): were read, agreed and signed. There were no matters arising.

9 Speaker:

 Club member Chris Donnison worked in the energy industry for over 40 years. The theme was energy security and prospects for the next 50 years. 

The UK is running out of fossil fuels fast and by 2030 we will rely on 70% renewables and nuclear. North Sea gas has only 10 years left. Chris reviewed the historical influences on energy consumption and supply: political and strategic, technological and economic and the research and development of new, viable sources. He made comparisons with France with its over 90% nuclear provision. Many UK oil employees now commute weekly to work in Paris. The dangers of nuclear power were outlined as were the economics of surveying for new supplies of oil, notably off Angola and Brazil. He foresaw a situation where domestic electricity in the future will largely come from solar panels and garden wind turbines. He displayed a map of the very complex inter-connectivity of pipe lines in the North sea and from the Ukraine to all over Europe. Finally he envisaged shale gas from fracking – there are already over 2000 wells – becoming a major energy source. 

.................................................

ORDINARY MEETING 26 NOVEMBER 2014 

1 Welcome – new Chairman Tony Baker welcomed all attending. There were no guests and happily no sickness reports

 2 Committee – the Chairman gave feedback from the meeting held earlier. He reminded members of their speaking obligations and said that there would be further discussion on the issue of the club’s civic profile as raised at the AGM. Honorary membership is to be offered to Roy Cross who has resigned as he is no longer able to attend regularly.

 3 Lunches – Ian Duncan reported that the Committee was recommending  lunch after every meeting and that accordingly more appropriate, smaller, menus and prices (£8-11) had been agreed with the chef Antonio. It was hoped more partners would attend. He reminded everyone to ensure they had paid and given in their menu choices for the Xmas lunch by the end of November.

 4 Trip -  Robert Riddell reported that the booking form for the visit to Salford ( & the BBC Tour) on 2 March would be circulated at the next meeting. The costs will be £13 for the coach and £8 for the BBC. A show of hands indicated viable support for having a meal at the club upon return. 

5 Minutes of 12 November – were read and approved with some small corrections.  There were no matters arising. 

6 Speaker  - Les Jobson “Why Must the Show Go On?” 

Les took his title from Noel Coward and this had led him to ponder on how such sayings come about and why do they get recorded? In the Theatre finance dictates that  the show must go on and he listed all those people who help create a show long before any ticket revenues are received. Long runs and (for the less commercial theatre) sponsorship and subsidies are essential. He had only experienced one night’s loss due to chicken pox (not his we assume).  Les went on with amusing anecdotes about several famous names, unions, events at the theatre in Billingham, agents, bill boards and audiences. 

Chairman Tony Baker thanked Les warmly for his usual thoroughly professional, informative and amusing talk. 

7 Next Meetings 

10 December – Chris Donnison on “Energy”

17 December – Xmas Lunch at the King’s Head

14 January  - Steven Charlton introducing John Watson talking about “The Border Reivers”

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 22/11/2014

                                                            “China & Tibet”

 Ian and his wife Val went there in 2013, flying first to Beijing, one of several Chinese cities that have 33M inhabitants. Tourism there is increasing, particularly from the Chinese themselves. They visited most of the well known sights in the capital before moving onto the Great Wall. Ian tried to explain why the locals love being photographed with Europeans whilst displaying 2 fingered gestures. He was impressed by their road signs. Next came the terracotta army and a souvenir industry just like everywhere. A 1100 mile flight took them to Tibet and Lhasa at over 12,00 feet high. Pandas followed and then a boat trip down the pollution ridden Yangste river. Their final destination was Shanghai where a highlight was the world’s only  magnetic (and 268mph) levitation train. 

Questions and comments followed on the organization of the trip, language problems, food e.g. rabbits on sticks, electricity wastage and pagodas being Nepalese in origin, not Chinese. 

          Chairman Tony Baker thanked Ian for a brilliant account.

______________________________________

12/11/2014

At the recent meeting member Colin Chitty gave a superbly illustrated talk entitled “Aspects of Civil Aviation”. 

          He addressed two themes – the history of aviation and governments’ roles in flight safety and economics.

          The global business is enormous with 9000 airports, 93,000 commercial flights per annum and 18,000 planes in the air. The UK has 228M passengers each year and Heathrow airport is the world’s 3rd busiest. He described the main periods of aviation history – Pioneers 1903-19, Pushing the Boundaries 1919-1929, the Golden Age 1930s,  and Modern Innovation 1960s onwards.

          Safety is now taken for granted but it was not so in the early days. Governments became increasingly regulatory from the 1930s but pilot error still is the main single cause of accidents. There is a difficult balance to strike between safety through regulation and innovation. Economic liberalization got a boost in 2008 with the Open Skies programme and low cost operators have driven competition. Fares are 40% of what they were in the 1970s. Profits remain cyclical and returns are only about 5% on investment. A major recent trend has been airline consolidation with over 200 examples in the USA alone.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

22 October 2014

 Welcome: Chairman John Deighton welcomed the 32 members present and guest (and prospective member) Roger Bishop. There were 6 apologies. 

Sickness: it was reported that Peter Hide is very poorly. 

Lunches: a reminder was given that the new arrangement for having post meeting lunches at the cricket club would be tried after the AGM on 12 November. A copy of Antonio’s menu had been emailed by Ian Dawson.

 4 AGM : a reminder was given that this will be at 10.00am on 12 November. 

5 Minutes (22 October) were read, approved and signed. 

6 Cricket Club: John Deighton has constructed temporary window blackouts but the club intend to provide curtains. The members’ lounge will become the restaurant and Michael Gauntlett outlined other plans for improving the facilities.

 (The Officers later spoke to Cricket officers and were told that the usual room would remain as our meeting venue along  with the comfortable seats.) 

7 Geoff Richmond: as this was his last meeting he took the opportunity to thank the club for its good wishes and friendship. 

8 Colin Chitty – “Aspects of Civil Aviation”. 

          After training as a chemical engineer Colin went into businessproviding safety technology for both civil and military aviation. 

          He addressed two main themes – the history of civil aviation and the role of governments in safety and the economics of flying.

          The global business is enormous with 9000 airports, 93,000 commercial flights per annum and 18,000 planes in the air. The UK has 228,000,000 passengers each year and Heathrow airport is the world’s 3rd busiest. Aviation has created 3.5% of man made climate change. Colin outlined likely trends in numbers,costs and size of planes and increasing fuel demands (and possible alternatives) and then went on to describe the main periods of aviation history – Pioneers 1903-19, Pushing the Boundaries 1919-1929, the Golden Age 1930s,  and Modern Innovation 1960s onwards.

          Safety is now taken for granted but it was not so in the early days. Governments became increasingly regulatory from the 1930s but pilot error still is the main single cause of accidents. There is a difficult balance to strike between safety through regulation and innovation. Economic liberalization got a boost in 2008 with the Open Skies programme and low cost operators have driven competition. Fares are 40% of what they were in the 1970s. Profits remain cyclical and returns are only about 5% on investment. A major recent trend has been airline consolidation with over 200 examples in the USA alone.

          Questions followed about Dakotas, Tees Valley, Concorde, crew rostering and risk management. 

          In thanking Colin for his entertaining and illustrative talk the Chairman  said that Colin had made us all reflect on our own flying experiences. 

9 Next Meeting: AGM 10.00am Weds 12 November.

---------------------------------------------------------------------

MINUTES OF ORDINARY MEETING

 8 October 2014

 1 Welcome: Chairman John Deighton welcomed all present (34), the speaker Mike Wood and Ian Dawson’s guest Roy Mynott. There were 6 apologies. 

2 Sickness: It was reported that John Ward is making some progress. 

3 Lunches: Stephen Charlton reported the results of the consultation with the Cricket Club’s new chef Antonio regarding having after meeting lunches in situ. These had been positive and could also result in a waiving of the room hire fee. A trial run will be held after the AGM meeting on 12 November and Ian Dawson will email the restaurant menu to members. A reminder was given about the Christmas Lunch at the King’s Head on Weds 17 December. The menu and booking forms have been distributed. 

4 Resignations: Vic Shadforth has moved to the South and Geoff Richmond has decided to concentrate on the Darlington Probus. The Chairman paid tribute to Geoff’s hard and efficient work when he was club Secretary. 

5 October Birthdays: were announced as – David Crane (80), John Ward (76) and John Halkon (74). 

6 AGM: the Secretary stated that notice slips and nomination forms were available on the table and reminded members that it would be at 10.00am on 12 November. 

7 Colin Williamson introduced the speaker, Mike Wood, on “A Magical Mystery Tour of Old Richmond.” Mike helped create the Richmondshire Museum, is a Master Fellmonger and ex Probus member. 

He has amassed a large collection of old visual materials including magic lantern and stereoscopic slides, post cards, 16mm films, engravings, early photos, diaries etc.  He showed this variety of media to perfection with images of the town, mainly from the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Richmond places, people, trades and industry were included and Mike skillfull y related many of these to those members who have lived here most of their lives. He even posed a theory that the Roman site of Cataractorum could have been in Richmond not Catterick as it does not have a cataract. There were polite references to ladies serving the interests of soldiers and leadminers. Knitting patterns and Fenwicks stores were both begun here. 

In thanking Mike for an absorbing talk the Chairman said how remarkable it was that so much had changed over the last 100 years. 

8 Next Meeting: Weds 22 October Colin Chitty will speak on “Aspects of Civil Aviation”

..................................................................................................

MINUTES OF THE MEETING OF 24 SEPTEMBER 2014

 

1 Welcomes: Chairman John Deighton welcomed the speaker, Dr Sam Riches and a guest, Gordon Alexander. 

2 Sickness: John Ward was reported as “could be better but could be worse” and John Ashton has had to miss several meetings owing to regular hospital appointments on Wednesday mornings. 

3 Lunches: prior to discussions about after meeting lunches the Chairman outlined how the club had reached the status quo of some 6-12 members going to the Black Lion after the first meeting of each month and the possibility of reverting to the Cricket Club now there is a new restaurant manager. It was agreed that the Chairman, Secretary and Stephen Charlton would discuss the practicalities with the chef Antonio after the meeting, and hopefully at the same time resolve which room future meetings would use.

 4 Minutes: of 10th September were read, agreed and signed. There were no matters arising. 

5 Michael Gauntlett gave details of the future programme of the Cricket Society (North East). 

6 Speaker: Dr Sam Riches was introduced by Phillip Welch to talk on “St George for Merry England and Beyond.” She is a leading expert, broadcaster and author on her subject and works at Lancaster University. 

Dr Riches began by stating that beyond the standard images of dragon slayer, rescuer of princesses and the red cross on white flag there are many myths and misconceptions about St George. He can be a Roman soldier or medieval knight; he is renowned – revered even - in a large number of European nations; can be Catholic or Orthodox or even Hindu or Judaic. Our understanding is as much due to the power of ideas as to historical evidence. The dragon did not appear until the middle ages and should be taken as a metaphor for evil. The name George only became popular with the 18th century Hanoverian kings and the saint gained popularity with the Pre Raphaelite artists and upon becoming England’s patron saint. The latter seems to have been more by popular acclamation in the 19th century than by any formal appointment. 

Questions followed which led to comments on sainthood protocols and Brazilian soap operas. 

In thanking Dr Riches for an absorbing talk the Chairman presented her with a card signed by the members and recalled that at a mummers’ play, dressed as St George, he once slew the dragon in the guise of a black prince. 

7 Next Meeting: Wed. 8 October – Colin Williamson introducing Mike Wood with subject yet to be announced.

 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------             
    MINUTES OF ORDINARY MEETING 10 SEPT 2014

 Numbers for the post meeting lunch were ascertained at 7. 

1 Chairman John Deighton welcomed the 25 members present. There were no guests and 5 apologies. 

2 Sickness Reports: David Bradford (an ex member) is receiving treatment for cancer and John Ward is continuing to improve. 

3 Birthdays: Fred Jary (97), Cedric Shaw (91), Phillip Crosse (85), Bill Gladstone (83), Alan Lomax (78), Davis Clark (76), Michael Eyles (73) and Robert Riddell (68). 

4 Committee Report: there had been decisions to (1) start the AGM on 12 November at 10am (2) to consult the Cricket Club about holding post meeting lunches and (3) whether to continue using the middle room for meetings.  This was agreed with 1 dissenter. 

5 Lunch Committee: the Christmas Lunch will be at the King’s Head on Weds 17 December. 

6 Minutes of 27 August: were read, agreed and signed. There were no matters arising.

7 Ken Stephens on “Old World versus New World Wines”         

 Ken introduced himself as an ex radio communications man with experience in the RAF, with Marconi and as a lecturer. He has taught and written on wine  (and presumably drunk it as well) for many years and is President of the North Yorks Wine Society.          

England has a longer tradition that might be expected; there 139 vineyards in the reign of Henry VII. Old World wines are from areas which have used vinus vinifera for centuries and New World wines are from places where Europeans took those vines from the early 16th century onwards. There are many other genus of vines but over 99% of all wine comes from grape varieties based on vinifera.  North, Central and South American countries, South Africa, Australia and New Zealand are the leading New World producers. Mexico (1520s), Chile (1534), South Africa (1661) and California (1779) were the earliest. Ken explained the devastating effect of phylloxera and that wine making was apparently saved by Cortes calling at Tenerife en route to Mexico and the discovery in the 19th century that New world root stock is immune to the root destroying louse. He went on to describe the techniques learned in the New that have been introduced to many part of the Old, such as fermentation temperature controls, better hygiene and more informative labels. Old World wines still take pride in the qualities of tradition and terroir but the New has broadened taste ranges and styles.          

Ken generously provided a tasting of a Sicilian red wine, Nero D’Avola, in this case from Tesco at £5.99.          

Comments and Questions included the Flying Winemakers, the effect of EU legislation on New World labeling, corks and screw tops and the high reputation of Lamberhurst wine in the Swiss Engadine valley.         

 In thanking Ken John Deighton recalled the cheap reds available in France in his youth and those days when we all made our own wines. 

8 Next Meeting: Wed. 24 September: Dr Sam Riches on “St George for Merry England.”


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Minutes of the Ordinary Meeting

27th August 2014

 

1. Welcome  Chairman John Deighton welcomed the members attending.  There were no guests and there were     apologies.

 

2. Sickness Reports   Chairman John Deighton reported there was no change in Peter Hide’s condition and John Ward is showing some improvement. 

 

3. Sub-Committees  Nothing to report.

 

4. Minutes of the 13th August   were read, agreed and signed as a correct record.  No matters arising.

 

5. A.O.B.  There was no other business.

 

6. The Chairman introduced our own member, Robert Riddell who spoke on the subject “From Grouse to Geese”.

 

Robert gave a very interesting talk on the grouse trains to Scotland from London on the east and west coast lines in the late eighteen hundreds which became known as the railway races of 1895.   This led to some very reckless activity by the train companies.   In one instance taking curves at high speed and depositing the passengers in a heap on the carriage floor and striking terror into their hearts.  There was another instance when the train left the rails and was wrecked and one person was killed and even the Signalmen came into the act by holding up either the east or west coast trains.

 

Robert then spoke about Sir Nigel Gresley  who became LNER’s Chief Engineer in 1923.  Sir Nigel came up with the idea of a corridor tender this allowed trains to run non-stop from London to Edinburgh in seven and a half hours.  Gresley continued to experiment to increase speed of travel and using a wind tunnel carried out tests with his friend, Etturi Bugatti to design streamlined locomotives.

 

Within six months they had designed and built four A4 loco’s – Silver Link, Silver King, Quick Silver and Silver Fox.  These loco’s, when pulling the Silver Jubilee train, broke several time records in the mid-nineteen thirties.   This success led to the addition of a further five A4 locomotives.  Sir Nigel Gresley was a great lover of wild ducks and birds and named two loco’s Golden Eagle and Golden Plover.   His most famous, however, was Mallard in 1938

 

 When the brand new Mallard went for the speed record it did a so called “brake testing run” to Grantham.  There were no paying passengers aboard but before the fast run back to London the LNER staff were offered the chance to take a taxi back to London – nobody took up this offer – and Mallard reached a top speed of 126 miles an hour on that run.

 

Six A4s still exist today.  Mallard, Sir Nigel Gresley, Union of South Africa, Bittern, Dwight D. Eisenhower and The Dominion of Canada.

 

To commemorate the 75th Anniversary of Mallard’s record breaking run, the six A4s were this year reunited at Shildon in County Durham.   A  homecoming unlikely to be repeated.

 

There were questions and comments from our members which reflected the interest that Robert had kindled.

 

In thanking Robert for his very interesting talk, the Chairman pointed out that he, along with most members of the Club, could remember these exciting days of steam.

 

7. Next Meeting – Wednesday 10th September.  Ken Stephens on  “Old World versus New World Wines”

...................................................................................................................................................................

MINUTES OF ORDINARY MEETING


Held at Richmondshire Cricket Club on Wednesday 23rd July 2014


1 Chairman John Deighton welcomed the 24 members present and Malcolm Woodman, guest of Robert Riddell. There were 8 apologies for absence.


2 Vice Chairman – the Chairman reported that unfortunately, due to the illness of his wife, Vice Chairman John Ward had resigned the post (though not his membership) but that the next in line, Tony Baker, had kindly agreed to step in.


3 Sickness – the return of Phillip Crosse and Keith Robson after hip operations was gladly pointed out. It was noted that Peter Hide was not well and it appeared to be a long term problem. Also Cedric Shaw had had a nasty fall.


4 After Meeting Lunch – the event at the Black Swan 2 weeks previously had been excellent – as were the fish and chips – for the dozen lunchers. 

As both lunch officers would be away at the next date Francis Rose kindly agreed to see to the details on the day (13 August).


5 Minutes, 9 July – these were read, approved and signed as a correct record. There was one matter  arising as Ken Stephens reported that the Library has a copy of the book on Richmond written by the last speaker.


6 Cricket Club – Ian Dawson reported that the Cricket Club has a new Steward Antonio who was providing free samples of his food from 

6 to 9 pm  on Thursday 24th July.


7 “New Zealand – A Tale of Two Islands” – the day’s talk by member Richard Wright.


Richard began by thanking Ian Dickinson for a last minute rescue of the slide technology. His talk was an account of a lengthy trip around 

New Zealand undertaken by himself and his wife in 2009. 

They had begun in Auckland and gone on to visit many of the famous volcanic and thermal sites and coastal stretches of North Island. 

A rather regimented mountain walk and a ride in a post bus were described.

After crossing Queen Charlotte Sound to the South Island their first adventure was walking the Abel Tasman Coastal path, notable for 

beaches, sand flies, sea lions and giant crayfish. Whale watching had proved disappointing but the ability of sheep to be the main cause of 

traffic jams had earned their admiration. From Christchurch they went into the Southern Alps, pausing only to dine out on worms and 

other ‘unusual’ foods. They took a helicopter ride to get the best views of glaciers and the highest peaks such as Mount Cook. 

A forest walk followed, then another plane ride before going to Queenstown, the world’s capital for adrenalin sports. Neither apparently indulged. 

Well not in bungee jumping anyway. A boat trip on the fjord of Doubtful Sound took them passed the last refuges of kiwis and out onto the 

Tasman Sea after which they made their way back to Christchurch before flying on to Australia.


Questions followed on winter weather, the height of Mount Cook, their travel and accommodation arrangements and why

 Richard had failed to mention Rugby.


In thanking Richard for the excellent talk and the wonderful photos John Deighton recommended a mixture of Dettol and 

olive oil as a sand fly deterrent and said that from his own experience New Zealand was a long way to travel but was well worth it.


8 Next Meeting – Weds 13th August when John Halkon will introduce Tony Aitchison talking on “Your Greatest Asset”.

________________________________________________________________


MINUTES OF ORDINARY MEETING 9 JULY 2014


1 12 members signed up for the day’s post meeting lunch.


2 Chairman John Deighton welcomed the 27 members present and the speaker, Mark Whyman. There were 6 apologies.


3 Keith Robson has undergone a hip replacement and is doing well.


4 July Birthdays were announced: Roy Cross (87), Harry Hodgkiss (86), Ken Stephens (78), Peter Hide (78), Alec Butler (73) and Chris Woodard (70).


5 John Ward introduced the speaker, Mark Whyman, a lecturer, writer and photographer who has specialized in heritage subjects, written a detailed survey of Richmond street by street and works with the local Planning committee. His subject was “Swaledale From Top to Bottom”, an account of his 2009 walk the length of the Dale, illustrated with photos taken at all times of the year.


Mark naturally began  at the source at Birkdale and Sleddale Beck. His journey down river mentioned all the major places of interest, many of which are less well  known than the more familiar spots. Bridges, notable houses, waterfalls, pubs and farms were featured, along with significant events affecting them such as being swept away in floods and being subject to variations in economic viability. The latter was particularly significant for the lead mines and agriculture. Mark gave much attention to the old coffin route from the upper dale to consecrated land in Grinton. The many religious foundations the length of the dale were mentioned. 

Below Richmond he had found considerable difficulty in keeping to the river as the path frequently diverged. It was clear that over the centuries the people of Swaledale had shown great pride in their often challenging environment.


Questions and comments featured coffins, mining other than for lead, model farming in Napoleonic times, the Hutton’s impact on South America and the ghosts of headless dogs.


In thanking Mark for his excellent talk John Deighton mentioned the new footpath from Boroughbridge to Kirkby Stephen, the Swaleway.


6 Next Meeting: Weds 23 July  Richard Wright on “New Zealand, a Tale of Two Islands.”


_________________________________________________________________________________



Meeting of 25 June 2014

Chairman John Deighton presented Phillip Crosse with Honorary Membership for long attendance and service to the club as auditor.

The day’s speaker was Dr Wilkinson on “The English Thoroughbred – Born and Bred in Swaledale”. 

          He explained that all the world’s thoroughbred horses can be traced back to the breeding activities carried out in North Yorkshire from the middle of the 17th Century. Prominent local centres had included Sedbury Hall (the D’Arcy family), Aske House (the Dundas/Zetlands) and Marske Hall (the Huttons). One D”Arcy, James, was royal stud master to Charles II. He outlined the connection of this specialized breeding and the expansion of racing to factors like climate and the availability of open grassy spaces. The changes were part of the rapid upheavals in the period; the urban renaissance, the industrial and agricultural revolutions and increased prosperity fostering advances in cultural and sporting activities. The thoroughbreds emerged from local mongrel mares and imported (at great expense) Arab stallions. He touched on the history of racing in Richmond (1765 to 1892) and said Catterick was on private land owned by the Broughs. James Watson, a Richmond trainer, began the French interest at Chantilly.

------------------------------------------------------------------------

Meeting of June 11th, 2014

1 The welcome to those present was extended by acting Chairman, John Ward. There were 31 present and 9 apologies. Also welcomed were potential new member, Ken Wynn and the day’s speaker, Marion Moverley. Also welcomed was Kelly Jopling the new bar manager at the Cricket Club.

2 Ian Dawson took numbers for the post meeting lunch at the Black Lion (6) and stated that he would be distributing Cricket Club membership cards.

3 Chris Woodard had sent his apologies as he was having a scan due to complications arising from a hip replacement in the past.

4 May Birthdays were announced – Keith Jackson (84), Ray Sheahan (70) and Michael Walton (69).

5 The minutes of the 23 April were read, agreed and signed. There were no matters arising.

6 Coffee and Lunches – Ian Dawson and Chris Robinson agreed to see what improvements Kelly Jopling could offer.

7 Trips – Robert Riddell announced that the visit to Salford and the BBC could not be booked any earlier than 2 March and that had now been fixed. Full details of costs etc would follow soon. Chris Robinson had put out a list for any potential interest in a 2015 visit to the Western Front.

MINUTES OF THE MEETING OF 14 MAY 2014

Richmond Probus Club enjoyed a fascinating talk by Marion Moverley, a tutor in local history and tour guide, on “Passing Through Yorkshire – A Look at God’s Own County from the 17th to the 20th Centuries. "

Marion said her sources were the diaries and other written accounts of those who visited Yorkshire in the period. She read excerpts from these writings and invited members to guess the author or identify the place being described. She began with John Leyland (Librarian to Henry VIII) and included several female travellers such as Lady Anne Clifford and Elizabeth Montague (the original blue stocking). Some visitors came for purposes other than early tourism, such as Arthur Young (the agriculturalist) and John Wesley. York, Ripon, Harrogate and the Dales had frequently featured but Richmond was often reported as shabby until the late Georgian developments. Her final visitor was “Matilda” the 1919 motor car of Henry Peerless. She found the hills of the Dales rather taxing. Questions were posed on Bishops’ Palaces, Gilling West and Ravensworth and Daniel Defoe’s descriptions of the local knitting industry.

________________________________

MINUTES OF THE MEETING OF 23 APRIL 2014


1 Chair John Deighton welcomed the 31 members present, Richard Beale (guest of Geoff Robinson) and Julia Mulligan, the guest speaker. There were 9 apologies.


2 Ossie Brooks – a minutes silence was held in memory of Ossie who had died last week.


3 Lawrence Barker has resigned as a member as his hearing has deteriorated.


4 The minutes of 9 April (kindly provided by Alan Lomax) were read, agreed and signed. There were no matters arising.


5 Lunches  - Ian Dawson announced the Committee recommendation of Xmas Lunch at the King’s Head on 17th December, thus creating space for an ordinary meeting on the 10th.  The Spring Lunch will be at the King’s Head on 26th March. The next after meeting lunch at the Black Lion will be on14th May. All these were agreed by the meeting.


6 Trips – Robert Riddell reported that the board and email canvass had produced Salford as a clear winner over Skipton but the sub-committee would need to confer with the BBC to arrange a suitable date. This could result in the trip being in 2015 although hopefully it will be earlier.


7 Cricket Bat – as presented by Andy Barlow of the Cricket Club at the last meeting. It was announced that the Committee (through Michael Gauntlett) were exploring presenting it to the Cricket Society.


8 Next Meeting – Weds 14 May with Bill Gladstone introducing Marion Moverley speaking on “Passing Through Yorkshire”.


9 John Brennand introduced Julia Mulligan, Police and Crime Commissioner for North Yorkshire to speak on “My Job and MyPolicy.” 


Julia began with the background to her election last November as 1 of 41 P & CCs for England and Wales. She was critical of the procedures which had contributed to a very low turn out and was pleased that the Electoral Commission had now taken over. It had cost £5,000 for a deposit and £25,000 to run her campaign against only one, far less active opponent. She said the key for her was accountability which had not been so under the old Police Authority, where there had been issues with several senior officers. She had appointed a new Chief Constable after re-advertising the post, ordered a Performance Review, reversed the reduction in officer numbers back up to 1400 and started to improve on the poor quality IT support. Julia commented on the need for a new HQ as the current one, a listed building is uneconomical to run and is to be replaced from capital reserves, saving half a million pounds per year. Her priorities are community engagement (especially in our many rural areas); improving performance monitoring; and interaction with other Commissioners and bodies such as the NHS. 

Questions were posed on why was there intrusion of party politics into the election and campaign funding, what personal qualities and beliefs had led her to come forward and are we moving towards elected senior police officers as in the USA?

The Chairman thanked Julia for a very informative talk and took heart form living in a low crime area. He hoped she will be successful in keeping that record.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Minutes of the Ordinary Meeting
9th April 2014

1. Welcome  Chairman John Deighton welcomed the       members attending.  There were no guests and there were      apologies.

2. Sickness Reports   Michael Gauntlett reported that Cedric Shaw was showing improvement and would attend shortly. 

3. Proposal for a New Member  Francis Rose who had been proposed by John Horseman and seconded by Chris Robinson was put to the members and agreed unanimously.

4. April Birthdays were announced – Philip Cross (90) now 25 years a member of Probus.  Philip Harvey (76) Bev Joicey (73) Peter Clarke (72) Bill Green (72)  Colin Williamson (72) and Ian Dawson (70).

5. Lunches  Stephen Charlton asked for numbers who required lunch at the Black Lion so that he could telephone with reservations – there were 8 members.

6. Trips Sub Committee Robert Riddell asked for Member’s opinions on holding a trip to Skipton in June and/or Salford Quays and BBC Media City as and when the Club could be accommodated.  A list was circulated.

7. AOB  Michael Larkman apologised for the debate “Modern Education – A Vexed Question” on the 12th March as the debate had not gone as he had expected.

8. Minutes of the 12th March were read, agreed and signed.  There were no matters arising.

9. Speaker  Peter Clarke introduced Andy Barlow who spoke about Richmondshire Cricket Club in the 2010’s.  

Andy thanked the Probus Club for their continuing support of the Cricket Club.  He stated that more use of IT such as Facebook, Twitter etc. is being used to promote the Club.

The Cricket Club was founded by George Roper in the early 1800’s on land given by Lord Zetland.  In 1905 a cycling track was added and the ground was given to the town and regular track cycling still takes place weekly, and also the Whit Monday Cycle Racing takes place.

Andy showed a short video with some interesting scenes in Test Matches England v. Australia, England was creative with substitute rules.  There were also picture of Richmond Cricket Club being presented with the 2013 trophies.  The Club professionals recruited for the 2014 season are Shanuka Dissanayake and Gary Platt.  

The finances of the Cricket Club are continually having to be reviewed.  Professional expenses, including  games, ground, clubhouse, equipment and umpires come to approximately £58,000 a year and the income from bar, membership, sponsors and fund raising approximately £63,000, the bar income making up 50% of this amount.

Andy continued his talk with explanations on the administration of Cricket in this country from grass roots through county, premier league and international level.  All of this overlooked by the ECB, England Cricket Board.

Richmond Cricket Club were heavily involved with the ECB Focus Club, The Chance to Shine to encourage young players, including ladies, and the Richmond Cricket Foundation which is making connections with Richmond School with a brand new pitch at the school and a pavilion.

2013 membership of the Club had been encouraging, 200 junior playing members which includes 50 girls, 50 adult players and 250 social members.  Membership fees are being invested in coaching schemes to children from six or seven years of age and the Club is a member of the Community Amateur Sports Club (CASC) which opens up the way to accessing grants etc. The Club runs 13 teams and has a partnership with the army with great help from the MOD, Help for Heroes etc.

The social side of the Club particularly the importance of bar takings has got to be the next priority for improvement.  Andy mentioned the Tour de France weekend when the Club is putting on “It’s a Knockout” as fund raising event.

Questions were taken from the floor discussing various aspects of the Club’s wellbeing.   The speaker was thanked by Chairman, John Deighton, for an interesting and informative talk.   Andy concluded his presentation by presenting the Probus Club with a cricket bat signed by Durham County players.

10 Next Meeting:   Wednesday 23rd April  John Brennand introducing  “My Job and My Policy” by Julia Mulligan, Police Commissioner for North Yorkshire.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

MINUTES OF THE ORDINARY MEETING  12 March 2014

1 Chairnan John Deighton welcomed the 35 attendees, Ken Wynn (guest of Nigel Copestake) and Francis Roe (guest of John Horseman). There were 12 apologies.

2 Lunches: Stephen Charlton asked for numbers to phone to the Black Lion for today’s lunch which might have been 11 or 12. Numbers for the Members’ Lunch on the 26th stand at 61.

3 Sickness Reports: Cedric Shaw and Lawrence Barker both hope to resume meetings very soon.

4 Birthdays were announced: Tom Walter (81), Tony Baker (76) and John Dickinson (74).

5 Minutes of 26 February: were read, agreed and signed.

6 Trip(s): Robert Riddell said that Salford had been the clear winner but the BBC could only take a maximum of 22 in one go and that no earlier than 3 September. A vote was taken to choose between that and a summer trip to the second choice, Skipton. This was a tie so further action was left to the sub committee.

7 Secretarial matters: Chris Robinson asked for names of those missing name badges and said an up to date membership list would soon be circulated.

8 St Theresa’s Hospice: John Deighton passed on their open invitation to attend their open session on 9 April.

9 Debate: Modern Education – A Vexed Question.

This was introduced by Michael Larkman and contributions followed from Tom Shovlin, Keith Robson, Tony Baker and Tony Baker. Each gave a brief resume of their own education and subsequent careers as teachers and head teachers in both schools and the armed services. Reference was made to the literacy needs of poorly educated soldiers and problems of poor numeracy comparisons with eg modern China. There were comments about grammar schools, the bedrock of the 3 Rs, and the need for IT skills. There were extensive quotations from past eminent educators and philosophers and comments were made about the need for teachers to be wizards and optimists. Agreement was reached that education should be about lighting fires not filling pots and that teachers should be allowed to be themselves. Comments from the floor included asking how bad head teachers can be dealt with, suggesting more could have been said about training leaders and combatting low expectations.

The Chairman thanked everyone for creating such a stimulating discussion.

10 Next Meetings: 

            Weds 26 March Members’ Lunch 12 noon at the King’s Head

Weds 9 April Peter Clarke introducing Andy Barlow speaking on “Richmond Cricket in the 2010s’

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

MINUTES OF THE ORDINARY MEETING

26 FEBRUARY 2014

Chairman John Deighton welcomed the 37 members in attendance. There were 7 apologies for absence. He also welcomed the speaker for the day, Mike Amos, and Francis Rose, a guest of John Horseman.

Gerald Swainston: The Chairman reported a communication from Gerald’s wife indicating that he was ill and was unlikely to be able to attend future meetings.

Minutes of 12th February: these were read, approved and signed by the Chairman. There were no matters arising.

Lunches:  Ian Dawson reminded members of the members’ lunch at the Kings Head on 26 March and the first of the resumed post meeting lunches at the Black Lion on 12thMarch.

Trips: Robert Riddell reported that from consultations to date Salford Quays (BBC, IWMN, Lowry Gallery) had become the choice with a date depending on the availability of a BBC tour (which the Secretary would fix asap.) At the next meeting a note will circulate for firm names and numbers to be noted.

The day’s talk.

John Harland introduced Mike Amos, an author and journalist to talk on “the History of the Northern League” of which he has been the Chairman for the last 18 years.

Mike started by saying the League is approaching 125 years since its foundation on March 25th 1889 in Durham, making it the second oldest soccer league behind only the FA (1888). 19 clubs were invited and 7 turned up. The founding father was Charles Samuel Craven about whom little else had been discovered until Mike managed to find his grave and contact descendants who provided details and a photo at long last. September 7th 1889 saw the first matches in a 10 team league with Darlington St Augustine’s being the first champions. They were apparently known for their abstemiousness and flatulence so it was perhaps a blessing that they then went bankrupt. A feature of the league from the start was the use of players ‘brought in’ by use of brown envelopes which in some cases meant players were ‘earning’ higher wages than proper professionals under the FA maximum wage yoke. In 1929 341 players were suspended for this. The practice did not end until 1974 when the concept of the amateur was ended. Several modern top clubs began in the league including Newcastle United and Middlesbrough. Mike commented on the popularity of the amateur game in the past, with Wembley regularly filled for the Amateur Cup Final which often featured League clubs such as Bishop Auckland, Crook Town and Blythe Spartans. West Auckland won the Thomas Livesey Cup -a sort of World Cup - in 1909 and again in 1911. The Northern League has had a variety of sponsors including Rothmans, brewers and Radio Luxembourg. It currently has 2 divisions with 45 clubs as levels 5 and 6 in the FA pyramid but the lack of floodlights has prevented Richmond Town belonging. Questions followed on the Pegasus club, Darlington FC, women’s soccer, the survival of the game at this level depending on volunteers and their love of the sport and how far team spirit in the past had been forged underground.
The Chairman thanked Mike Amos for a revealing talk and led the members in appreciation.

Next Meeting: 12th March when Michael Larkman will lead a debate on “Education – A Vexed Question.”

---------------------------------------------------------

MINUTES OF ORDINARY MEETING - 22 January 2014

1 Chairman John Deighton welcomed those present. There were 30 with apologies from 6; there were no guests.

Angus Goodfellow: a minute’s silence was held in memory of Angus who had recently passed away. He joined the club in the 1970s, was Secretary from 1996 to 2009, Chairman in 2009-10 and since then an Honorary Member. His funeral is to take place later today.

Ossie Brook: Ossie’s wife has written to the Chairman saying that the time had come for Ossie to retire from Probus and he sent his best regards to the Club.

4 Minutes 8 Jan 2014: these were read, agreed as correct and signed by the Chairman.

5 Treasurer: Ian Dawson thanked members for paying subscriptions which are nearly complete.

Lunches: Ian reported that details for the Members’ Lunch on 26 March had been agreed with the King’s Head and that menus/requests for payment had been sent by email or given out at this meeting. Guests will be welcome.

            After meeting lunches will begin on 12 March at the Black Lion. No preordering will be required and their early bird menu will be offered at £9.50 for 2 courses or £11.50 for 3. Numbers will be determined at the start of meetings. Guests will be welcome.

            For the next few weeks enquiries on the lunches should be addressed to Stephen Charlton.

7 The Day’s Talk

Keith Robson introduced Dr. Peter Norton, an old friend of the Club. His title “Restoring Old sailing Boats”

Peter confessed to a lifelong passion for sailing and in particular the restoration of “City of Edinboro”, a Hull trawler built in 1884. She was built in 3 months by William McCann, whose name she later took, and had an overall length of 110 feet. She was so well built Lloyd’s Register rated her as 100/A1. Fine woods were used including American elm (keel), English oak (planks) and Baltic oak. Peter described in detail the fishing techniques used in her early days, particularly on the Dogger bank whence catches of cod, halibut and turbot were sent to Billingsgate. The work was arduous, even brutal and dangerous. Peter chronicled the ship’s later life, working in Iceland and the Faeroes from 1913 to 1984. She was fitted with engines and bought by Henry Irving, Peter’s friend, who restored her for private passenger hire. She voyaged all over the seaboard of Western Europe but this ended when she broke her back after running aground in Brittany. A Trust purchased the vessel but the costs of restoration were far beyond their resources so she was sold to the Excelsior Trust and is now in a sad shape in a tent in Lowestoft needing well over a million pounds to be spent. As the Trust does not have these funds Peter did ask if any member happened to have them in their back pocket.

Questions followed on the spelling of her name, how many men had been needed to build her, ballasting and dealing with steering emergencies.

The Chairman thanked Peter for his fascinating talk and led the members in applause.

Next Meeting: 12th February when David Crane will introduce Ged Barker on ‘The World of Racing Pigeons.’

_____________________________________ 

MINUTES OF THE ORDINARY MEETING 8 JANUARY 2014

1 Chairman John Deighton welcomed all attending. There were no guests. There were 29 present with apologies received from 9.

2 Sickness Reports: Lawrence Barker was reported as much improved and hoping to resume attendance soon. Bill Gladstone had been at the Christmas Lunch and his hip operation had been satisfactory.

3 January birthdays: Frank Faulkener (96), Gerald Swainston (85), Bob Burrell-Cory (83), Michael Larkman (79), John Deighton (76), Chris Donnison (69) and Colin Chitty (67).

4 Minutes of 27 November: were read, agreed as correct and signed.

5 Roy Cross: was congratulated on being awarded the BEM in the New Year Honours for many years civic service to Richmond.

6 Christmas Lunch: Ian Dawson and Stephen and Carol Charlton were warmly thanked for organizing what had been a most enjoyable event.

7 Contact details: it was agreed that the secretary should distribute any relevant materials to those members with email facilities via the blind copy facility.

8 Treasurer: Ian Dawson asked for outstanding subscriptions to be dealt with at the end of the meeting.

9 Lunches sub committee: Ian said he and Stephen had started planning the Members’ Lunch which will be at the King’s Head on Wednesday 26 March. He also asked for a show of interest in resuming a monthly after meeting lunch. Possible venues are the Greyfriars Café, the Black Lion and Wetherspoons. Sufficient support was shown for them to continue with planning.

10 MICHAEL WALTON “40 Years in the NHS”

Michael said most of his stories were from personal experience but that his wife had banned smut. He was glad to be here having once been taken for dead. He had trained as a Doctor at Bart’s in London where a major early challenge was taking blood. Much of the learning was by humiliation and the atmosphere of the film ‘Doctor In The House’ was sometimes not too far from reality. Michael described the rigours of being on call for 120 hours, the arcane matter of ‘ash cash’, and absentee or inadequate colleagues in the days before whistle blowing became evident. He described most of those he had worked with as heroes. A stint in Oxford saw him specialize in anaesthetics which he eventually practiced at the Friarage from 1979.  It had been an ex RAF hospital and gained a high reputation for its nursing care. He described the ‘Brompton Cocktail’ which appeared to be some sort of way of speeding up the alleviation of pain in a way that was dramatic. One recipient was King George V, who has been accused of varying final words, but apparently expired by saying “bugger you Dr. Dawson” not “Bognor”. Michael concluded with some pithy thoughts on the NHS today, such as the increase in patient numbers, improving longevity and the chronic nature of much modern illness.

The Chairman thanked Michael and the membership showed its appreciation.

11 Next Meeting: 22 January when Keith Robson will introduce Peter Norton speaking on “Restoring Old Sailing Boats.”

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Minutes of Meeting at Richmondshire Cricket Club - 13th November 2013 Following the Annual General Meeting held on Wednesday 13th, the new Chairman John Deighton invited Harry Hodgkiss to introduce the speaker for the day, Richard Almond who he described as a Richmond resident, author and retired teacher. His subject was ‘Hunting in Parks and Forests 1200 – 1600.’ There were 2 main themes addressed: Universality (nearly everyone, irrespective of social class) hunted in the Middle Ages both for food and fun, and Gender Equality (as women indulged as much as men, such that notably the Greeks had Artemis and the Romans Diana as their hunting Gods.) The absence of written sources had led to research in Art in all its forms. These had revealed technical manuals, famous hunters and the variety of prey and methods. The hunted included red deer (harts), fallow deer, hares, wild boar and wolves but oddly enough not foxes. Different species of hounds and their handlers had specialist tasks, camouflage was used and the sport had complex rules and rituals e.g. ladies were presented with deer feet and hunts were often preceded by careful analysis of deer droppings. There were descriptions of weapons, falconry, and the use of Royal Forests and enclosed Parks. Rabbits were not hunted as such but were reared for food and fur. Questions followed on hunting as preparation for soldiering; poaching and punishments (less severe than commonly supposed); specialist breeding and importation of deer and the local feature - Hartley Well.

The Chairman led the members’ thanks to Richard and before closing the meeting gave a reminder that the next meeting will be on Wednesday 27th November at the Cricket Club. It will take the form of a 1960s Quiz organized by Michael Gauntlett.

------------------------------------------------------------------------

Minutes of Meeting at Richmondshire Cricket Club- 23rd October 2013-Present (36) Apologies (8)

After the Chairman`s welcome, announcements, and update on those indisposed, the Minutes for the 9th October 2013 were read, approved and signed. Notices included a revised xmas lunch menu and the AGM start time of 10.15AM on the 13th November 2013. Member Nigel Copestake introduced Newcastle University Emeritus Professor John Derry to talk about “Hitler.” In a masterly analysis of Hitler`s early life, influences, rise to power, and emerging maniacal character, John provided members with a fascinating account of the shaping, development, aggression and ultimate downfall of a man whose actions have influenced everyone`s life. The “Bohemian Corporal” from Austria, suffering early rejection of his ambition to be an artist, decorated in the first war then imprisoned after a failed Putsch, found his platform through the then minority Nazi power from which his anti-Semitism and ruthless political ambition exploded-the rest as they say is history. John`s remarkable recall of detail and insight, such as Hitler’s early and subsequent admiration for Robert Wagner, the emotion and purported mystic qualities of his music, enhanced John`s thought provoking address which exposed the several sides of Hitler`s psyche and kept Members enthralled. The Chairman thanked John for his spellbinding account, warmly supported by Members. The talk had provided a wonderful insight to this strange man.

Next Meeting and AGM-13th November 2013-10.15AM. Richard Arnold-”Hunting and Parks in the Middle Ages.”

................................................

Minutes of Meeting at Richmondshire Cricket Club -9th October. Present (29) Apologies (8).

After the Chairman`s welcome and announcements, the Minutes for the 25th September were read, approved and signed. Business included the 30th November deadline for booking and payment for the Xmas Lunch and a majority preferring to include post luncheon entertainment- the detail to be finalised. Closing date for Committee nominations-23 October.

Chris Donnison introduced Fred Magee to talk about "A project manager in the oil industry.” An interesting account of Laing Offshore`s construction of the first of the four main steel structures of a fixed leg platform, or 'jacket', for BP`s development of the Forties Field project provided members with a first hand account of the enormous scale, construction and logistical challenges. Built at the Graythorpe Shipyard at the Seaton Channel on the River Tees, “Graythorpe One"was floated in June 1974 to commence its 400km journey to emplacement. The availability of local craftsmen and fabricators, access to deep water and an available workforce of some 1500, were crucial to the contract which utilised 800 short ton giant Hoist and Derrick revolver cranes and heavy duty crawler cranes. Photos of the initial stages of construction suggested an incomprehensible interlinked mass of steel, Members requiring Fred`s expert help until the final shape emerged. An artist`s impression of the drilling derrick finally put it all into perspective, as did the 500,000 barrels, or 17.5 million gallons a day produced from the Oil Field. Thanking Fred, the Chairman said all had appreciated learning more about the construction.

Next Meeting: 23rd October -"Hitler" talk by John Derry, Emeritus Professor of Newcastle University.

................................................

MINUTES OF THE MEETING OF 25 SEPTEMBER 2013 AT RICHMONDSHIRE CRICKET CLUB

26 members attended and there were apologies from 11.

Chairman John Horseman welcomed a particularly thin (in numbers not girth) but elite attendance and would have welcomed new member John Ashton who was unable to attend due to a hospital visit. He reported 2 resignations, Bill Simms and Ian Hughes. He welcomed Paul Brooks, today’s speaker who would be introduced by Steven Charlton. To his obvious relief and surprise the Chairman had no sickness to report.

Chris Robinson, as stand-in Secretary, read the minutes of 9th September as the Secretary was apparently enjoying the flesh pots of Brighton. They were accepted, approved and signed. There was no other business and the Chairman invited Steve to introduce the speaker.

The title was “A Harbourmaster’s Tale” and Paul, the Deputy HM for Hartlepool & Teesport, provided a description of the port’s workings. He had joined in 1995 after a career in the Merchant Navy where he gained a Master’s certificate. He began with the enabling Act of 1847 and said that by 1863 Stockton was at the heart of activities and Middlesbrough just a village. The mid 19th century discovery of iron ore in the Cleveland Hills changed all that. The Tees was straightened, mud flats were reclaimed and ICI came to dominate. The port is now the 10th largest in Europe, handling 54 million tons of cargo per annum.

Marine charts and pictures of harbour and cargo vessels were shown. These include pilot cutters, foy Boats (rope handlers), tugs and dredgers. There are over 60 marker buoys. It is a freight only facility and is used by oil and chemical tankers, container ships, cargo ferries, and ore carriers (iron and coal for the newly re-opened blast furnace at Redcar). Other users include surveyors and oil rig servicers.

In 2010 Hartlepool was the terminus of the Tall Ships Race  and Paul was put in charge, and clearly enjoyed every challenging but exciting moment of the 4 years planning as well as the event itself. He showed pictures of several of the wonderful sailing ships which had come from many nations including Indonesia.

Members’ questions touched on sea-traffic jams and one way systems; the work of Customs & Excise (surprisingly low key); radio communications; commercial contracts for harbour boats and the ownership of the port (which is currently with a Canadian company.)

The Chairman thanked Paul for a fascinating and eye opening account.

The next meeting is on 9thOctober when Chris Donnison will introduce Fred Magee with a talk on “A Project Manager in the Oil Industry.”

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Minutes of Meeting at Richmond Cricket Club-

-11th September 2013-Present (27) Apologies (8)

Chairman John Horseman opened the meeting, welcoming members, especially Alan Lomax and guest speaker Paul Nixon. There  were no new sick reports. After a long list of September Birthdays, including a number of distinguished elder Probus Statesmen, Members unanimously endorsed Committee`s approval of John Ashton`s membership application.The Minutes of the 28thAugust meeting were read, approved and signed. Members accepted and approved that the xmas lunch on the 18th  December would be the only Probus gathering for that month. The Secretary advised that nomination formsfor the 2013/2014 election of officers would be available at the 9th October meeting. Bill Green then introduced his speaker Paul Nixon to talk about the Catterick Town Centre proposals. Members learnt that Kier Property and Lingfield Securities had established a joint venture named Lingfield (Catterick) Ltd to develop a £25 million revamp of the centre of Catterick Garrison town centre to create a leisure and retail park styled  “Princes Gate,” a complex close to the leisure centre. Paul, a Kier representative, explained  that outline planning was first received in 2007, but the joint venture did not take off until February 2013 with completion scheduled for February 2015. The proposals, after apparently much consultation with local interested parties, includes retail units, food and leisure space, a 60 bedroom hotel and a five screen cinema. It is suggested it will create some 700 jobs, provide ample parking and improved pedestrian and vehicular links. Paul carefully explained the detailed plans and some of the construction challenges relating to drainage and elevation of the site. The stated aim is to complement existing facilities in Catterick and surrounding towns, with materials used sympathetic to the local environment with the concept of a new open space providing a social heart to existing and new facilities. Whereas members recognised the case for additional facilities for the Garrison complement (the largest in Europe) and their families, there was nothing in members reaction to the proposals and subsequent questions suggesting recognition of innovation or attractiveness in the building`s design or indeed any interest at all at the few named occupants of the outlets-such that Richmond residents would alter the direction of their retail and leisure habits. The reality of course of what is achievable is the constraint of available funding. The rationale for the name “Princes Gate” seemed obscure. The Chairman in thanking Paul for his detailed exposition of the Complex, recognised that development was overdue but suggested that it would have a major inpact on surrounding towns such as Bedale and Leyburn.

Next meeting 25th September - Paul Brooks - "A Harbourmaster's Tale".

_________________

Minutes of Meeting at Richmondshire Cricket Club - 

28th August 2013-Present (29) Apologies (8)

Chairman John Horseman opened the meeting, welcoming members including new member Ray Sheahan and prospective member John Ashton, guest of Robert Riddell. Encouraging updates were received on David Whittaker and Alan Lomax. The Minutes of the 14th August meeting were read, approved and signed. The Treasurer reported that the Xmas Lunch was now booked for The Kings Head Hotel on the 18th December. Alec Butler then

introduced his speaker Doug Whorton, the title “Paris”.

Doug, a regular speaker to members, presented pictures and humorous commentary in his inimitable style of a coach trip to Paris of uncertain historic date. It quickly emerged that his presentation was a reprise of his illustrated talk in August 2009. Alas very few of the 22 new Probus members joining since 2009 were present. Nevertheless, Doug as usual, managed to evoke many chuckles and appreciation of the unusual camera angles employed.

The Chairman in thanking Doug, recalled his own directional problems when visiting this beautiful city, which in turn prompted members to recount several of their own escapades “En France.”

Next Meeting 11th September - Paul Nixon -“Proposals for Catterick Town Centre“

                                                                            

Minutes of Meeting at Richmond Cricket Club-

14th August 2013-Present (28) Apologies (9)

Chairman John Horseman opened the meeting, welcoming members & John Ashton, guest of Robert Riddell. Best wishes were sent by the Chairman to both Alan and Audrey Lomax after hearing a report of a recent accident and to Cedric Shaw following a family bereavement. Members then endorsed Committee`s approval of Ray Sheahan`s membership application. After the August birthdays, including Les Jobson 91, the Minutes of the 24th July meeting were read, approved and signed. After reports on alternative venues and available dates for the Xmas lunch, members voted for The Kings Head Hotel on the 18th December 2013.

Under  Any Other Business, The Chairman read Alan Earl`s acceptance letter in appreciation of his Grant of Honorary Membership. The Chairman thanked Bob Burrell - Corey for stepping in at short notice to cover the absence of the scheduled speaker. After Alec Butler`s introduction, Bob entertained members with a slide show of unrelated subjects each with a common factor of either stunning or poignant scenes, all accompanied by carefully selected mood music ranging from Pavarotti, Prokopiev`s 'Dance of the Knights', to 'The Good The Bad and The Ugly'. The subject matter included the stunning Italian coastline, lakes, and architecture, the construction of both the Hoover Dam Bypass Bridge, and of 'The Titanic', the futility of The American Civil War, and the 'Bridge on the River Kwai' as it is today. He concluded on a gentler, lighter note with attractive local outdoor scenes of family life, and tributes to and photos of man`s best friend.

The Chairman thanked Bob for an entertaining, diverse presentation which clearly contrasted scenes of sadness & hardship with the delight and enjoyment of others.Next Meeting 28th August- Doug Worton - "PARIS!"

 -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Minutes of Meeting at Richmondshire Cricket Club -

24th July 2013 - Present (33), Apologies (6).


Chairman John Horseman opened the meeting, welcoming members, guest speaker the Rev. Mel Gray, and Ray Sheahan, guest of John Deighton. There were no new adverse health

reports. The Minutes of the 10th July meeting were read, approved and signed. No matters

 arising. Under Any Other Business, after discussion, a majority of members preferred an

alternative venue  for the 2013 Xmas lunch, two venues are under consideration. The newly

formed luncheon sub group of Ian Dawson and Stephen Charlton, welcomes any additional

volunteers. Members endorsed committee members' decision to decline their invitation from

RCC to a freebie food and wine event - an inappropriate way to expend recently increased subscriptions.

Stephen Harwood then introduced the former Vicar of St James Church, Melsonby to deliver

 “God Collard.” Mel Grey opened suggesting that the title was meaningless, he was a man to

 change his word, he was going to give extracts of his earlier 20 years teaching experience.

 Members were firstly provided with a series of all too familiar anecdotes and school trip

 mishaps which many were able to identify with, the Headmaster whose school had to excel on

 the sports field, and the whims of head-of-table serving meals. More interestingly, was his

 introduction to the purported priorities of teaching - the register and the cane - all the

stuff of  legend that fills the pages of Friends Reunited. Mel reflected on his later

experiences of  teaching in a Comprehensive School, including amusing and constructive

ways of dealing with declining standards of dress, closing with -“Sorry, he cannot come to

school today - whose speaking? It`s me dad.” Members then recalled some of their own

schoolboy escapades  with apparent affection. The Chairman, in thanking Mel Gray for his

talk, recalled his own school lunches - agreeing that if the Prefect liked the food, you were

then only served a  small portion.

Next Meeting - 14th August 2013 -”Paris” - Doug Wharton.

 -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Minutes of Meeting at Richmondshire Cricket Club- 10th July 2013-Present (30) Apologies (7).

Chairman John Horseman opened the meeting, welcoming members, including new Member Chris Woodard, and the day`s speaker David Harvey. There were no new adverse health reports. Best wishes had been received from Lillie Clowes. After a number of July birthdays, the Minutes of the 26th June meeting were read, approved and signed. The Chairman welcomed a Member`s expression of interest in the Secretary vacancy for the coming year. The Treasurer advised that Cricket Club membership cards were in the course of being issued, more to follow, all had paid, some forms had not been completed correctly. Members warmly endorsed Committee`s approval of Honorary Membership for popular Member Alan Earl.

Philip Harvey, detailing David`s extensive CV, introduced his son to to talk about Risky Business in Outdoor Education. A former Richmond schoolboy, David respectfully noted former teachers present and revealed that attending a Chris Bonnington lecture and participating in the Duke of Edinburgh scheme were the foundation blocks of his vocation which has included Edale YHA activity Centre, Canolfan Conway Centre, an MA in Education, and latterly Hinning House, Eskdale, and Head of Centre at Lowbank Ground at Coniston working for the Brathay Trust. Providing an interesting insight, David`s work involves managing “Risk” the necessity for which he amusingly illustrated with a series of arguably needless warnings e.g.”Caution this sign has sharp edges!” Members also learnt that if you take a risk and suffer injury after due warning, Tomlinson v Congleton Borough Council may stand in the way of compensation.

David explained that outdoor learning is an active, experiential approach to learning open to all, involving being outdoors as a central part of experience-it transforms that experience into knowledge, skills and actions. Further insight included the growth in Regulations, an Adventure Licensing Authority, stats on Accidental deaths and some health and safety myths. David is the current National Chair of Heads of Outdoor Education Centres. Summing up, he suggested that Risk Assessments need to be both generic and site specific, and importantly, recognise the benefits of outdoor activity which provides huge interpersonal and other life skills. The greater risk is obesity. In the words of Bertrand Russell-“A life without adventure is likely to be unsatisfactory.”

After many questions reflecting Member`s interest, the Chairman gave thanks for a wonderful presentation, highlighting health and safety issues-not quite what he had expected.

Next meeting- 24th July 2013- Rev. Mel Gray-”God Collared.”

 -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Minutes of Meeting at Richmondshire Cricket Club - 26th June 2013 - Present (29), Apologies (8).

Chairman John Horseman opened the meeting, welcoming Tom Butler, brother and guest of member Alec Butler. There were no member health reports. Committee`s approval of Chris Woodard`s membership application was unanimously endorsed by members. The Minutes of the meeting of the 12th June were read, approved and signed. There were no matters arising. Under AOB, the Chairman advised that the Secretary would not be standing for re-election at the end of the current Probus year, thanked him and invited members to consider volunteering for the office.
Member Bev Joicey then presented an intriguing "Tale of Cookery, High Jinks and Murder.”
A chance introduction to the work of artist and one time fashion model, photographer and cookery writer Lee Millar, led Bev on an intriguing investigative trail exploring Bloomsbury country in East Sussex and elements of Bohemian lifestyle of the period. A tortuous research path included the notable Gwynne family and in particular Sir Roland Vaughan Gwynne of Folkington and later Wootton Manor. A man of politics pursuing an extravagant life style, male lovers and eventual debt led to his decline. Gwynne`s association with a local Doctor provided the central character of the scene Bev had set, one John Bodkin Adams, arguably the precursor of Harold Shipman. Emerging evidence in the 1950s suggested that his vast wealth was the product of legacies, “eased” with Adams` assistance, from admiring elderly lady patients. Charges were brought but circumstantial evidence suggests that links between Gwynne, the Lord Chief Justice and the trial judge secured his acquittal. The not guilty verdict fuelled rumours of homosexual relationships between Adams and powerful politicians and suggested that Govt might have sabotaged the outcome, fearing that his possible execution might adversely affect the NHS, not to mention the Doctor! Bev`s full description cleverly revealed the influences, character, and attitudes of the interesting web of intrigue in the social and political networks of the time, an account much appreciated by members and prompting many questions and observations. He was warmly thanked by the Chairman for his fascinating account.

Next Meeting 10th July 2013-David Harvey- "Risky Business, Outdoor Education in the 21st Century”

_________________

Minutes of Meeting at Richmondshire Cricket Club - 12th June, 2013. Present 33, Apologies 6.

Chairman John Horseman opened the meeting, welcoming the members. He paid tribute to Member Tom Forrest who recently passed away. Tom had joined Probus in 1993. The members stood in silent tribute. The Chairman then welcomed Chris Woodard, guest of John Deighton and John Wagstaff, guest of Geoffrey Hope. Matters arising: The Tresurer thanked Members for the quick response to his request for additional Membership subscriptions.

Any Other Business

Robert Riddell gave a brief report on the Day Trip to Leeds Armoury and Tropical House. The Chairman thanked Robert and the trip committee for their efforts and attention to detail which were enjoyed by all who attended. John then introduced our member, Les Jobson, who gave an amusing talk entitled : "Was This Really Me?" with anecdotes, stories and even song. Les started on his early life, born in a pit village beside a big pit. Between 9 and 10 years old he had heard the voice of Ernest Lough, a famous boy soprano of the day and Les was entered by his School Master into a competition. He did not know how many others entered but Les won by  enticing Maud into the garden. After a concert in Darlington he was invited back to the big house with a grand piano, and after gaining plenty of applause, he never worried about audiences again. This resulted in 45 years' connection with stage and theatre, with stories of Cilla Black, Bob and Alf Pearson and other theatrical personalities. On the commencement of World War II he joined the RAF and was put into air crew, trained in Southern Rhodesia in navigation, signals, bomb aiming and gunnery, and had instruction on Tiger Moths - how to take off, fly level, spin but never how to land but he is still with us so he must have got that right. Les was then posted to Ceylon on Catalina Flying boats as navigator, where they flew up to 20 hours at a time with Les using direct reckoning. After becoming  Bomb Leader Category 1, he was sent to drop rice in Malaysia. After the war, back to the theatre producing many big shows in London theatres and, of course, at the Forum, Billingham for many years. He had many encounters with well known personalities, such as Claire Bloom, Ingrid Bergman and the Crazy Gang. Les is still in contact with many well known names from this period. Les finished his talk with the words - Was That Really Me?

After questions from the Members, Chairman John closed the meeting by warmly thanking Les for his highly entertaining talk and hoped that Members and Guests had enjoyed the meeting.

Next Meeting - 26th June 2013 - "A Tale of Cookery, High Jinks and Death" by Bev Joicey.

__________________

Minutes of Meeting at Richmondshire Cricket Club-22nd May 2013-Present (tba); Apologies (tba)

Chairman John Horseman opened the meeting, welcoming the reduced, elite Membership present. He paid tribute to Hon. Member Denis Laidlaw who had passed away on the 14th May. He was 88 and the longest serving Probus Member. A strong vibrant, and very supportive character, he had fought his illness very bravely. Members stood in silent tribute. After a further update on the health of Angus Goodfellow, the Minutes of the Special Meeting on the 8th May were read, approved and signed. Treasurer Ian Dawson briefly explained his letter to all Members requesting further payment and completed documentation by the next following meeting. The Minutes of The General Meeting also on the 8th May were read, approved and signed. There were no matters arising. Under AOB, Robert Riddell requested prompt attendance at 8.15AM for the Leeds trip on the 5th June, a detailed itinerary for which would be available on the day. Members expressed interest in Geoff Robinson`s proposal that other venues be considered for post meeting lunches. Michael Larkman then presented an enjoyable and amusing quiz which sparked much interactive and witty repartee. A very pleasant event was once again won by Philip Harvey, ably assisted by Fred Jary and Les Jobson, all three gentlemen rewarded with a fine bottle of refreshment by the quizmaster. Michael concluded with an amusing anecdote and was warmly thanked by the Chairman who disclosed that the questions had, regrettably, failed to revitalise his own mind. Next Meeting 12th June 2013-Les Jobson-“Was that really me?”

--------------------------------

MINUTES OF MEETING AT RICHMOND CRICKET CLUB-8th MAY 2013-PRESENT 37-APOLOGIES 13

Chairman John Horseman opened the meeting, and welcomed guest speaker Ewen Macintosh. There were no new sick reports. Angus Goodfellow had expressed his delight at receiving Hon Membership. After the May birthdays, the Minutes of the 24th April meeting were read, approved and signed. There were no matters arising. Under Any Other Business, Robert Riddell said there were a few places left for The Armouries Trip, the balance of payment being due at the next meeting.

Tom Shovlin then introduced Ewen Macintosh to talk about “The Development of War in the 19th Century”. Ewen`s educational and military background, currently a part-time history lecturer, underpinned his interesting overview of warfare over 3 centuries, suggesting benefit in the long view as history often repeats itself, where the pendulum of technological developments has swung from defence to offence to reflect advances, alongside the gradual replacement of total with limited war. Ewen`s wealth of knowledge and relaxed delivery provided members with a clear picture of the influences on strategic warfare, ranging from the virtual devastation  mentality in milder months of limited offences. Major influences in the nineteenth century clearly being the mass army tactics following the French Revolution and weaponry advances of breach loading and repeater guns which brought the change from frontal attack to trench warfare. Ewen who had illustrated his views with several remarkable extracts from first hand accounts, stressed the necessity in the futility of warfare of learning from hindsight. Members had many questions and warmly endorsed the Chairman`s thanks to Ewen.

 Next Meeting-22nd May- Michael Larkman-'General Knowledge Quiz'.

------------------------------------

MINUTES OF MEETING AT RICHMOND CRICKET CLUB-24th APRIL 2013-PRESENT

 33-APOLOGIES 

Chairman John Horseman opened the meeting, and welcomed members to their august club. He advised that, sadly, popular and well respected Honorary Member Philip Glithro had passed away on the 21st April. He would be very much missed. Members stood in silent tribute. Funeral at Richmond Methodist Church, 2.00PM, 2nd May 2013. After updates on other recent Honorary Membership recipients, the Minutes of the meeting on the 10th April 2013 were read, approved, and signed. The Secretary advised that all had received notice of the SGM on the 8th May 2013, either by e-mail or post. A Proxy voting facility was available. Robert Riddell recorded that a 33 seater coach was now full for the Armouries trip, a 45 seater would be booked if more apply. There was no other business. The Chairman then thanked John Dickinson for stepping in at short notice and invited him to speak about “War in The Gulf 1991”. John suggested that if asked “What did you do in the War ?”- his clearly modest answer would be “Not very much!” He explained that this short, one sided air and ground war provided very little for him to boast about and indeed ended for him in ignominy. After providing a brief introductory timeline of the conflict and an outline of the principal protagonists, John`s story is one of a Consultant Physician based at an RAMC Military Hospital proceeding to dedicated training at Feldom Ranges, NBC battle runs and other activity prior to staffing what was to be 22 Field Hospital in Saudi. Not exactly MASH, John succeeded in adding much good humour to his account with several anecdotes and observations. Initially he flew out to Aljubail - courtesy of Kuwait airlines for further training, then on to Al Quaisuma, near Hafar Al Batin where the hospital was situated. Here 22 consisted of many containers, installed using a demountable rack off load and pick up system ( Drops) - all surrounded by a berm - a huge protective raised barrier - mainly of sand. It was clear that activity in 22 field hospital was relatively routine, however John`s account , photography, and further anecdotes revealed the ingenuity and adaptability of these dedicated professionals. After the war was over, repatriation was slow, when moral was already low, intense training for huge casualties never really being tested. John alleviated this by organising a leaving concert by Gurkas. He himself then suffered some ignominy when a collapsed sand pit deposited him in a burning pit where he suffered blistered feet and an embarrassing evacuation to a Norwegian Hospital. His final anecdote was the sad case of a Rumanian Hospital where Methyl Alcohol was mistakenly consumed, resulting in blindness and fatalities. John, after a both honest and modest account, concluded that his Gulf War experience was not a good one. After many questions reflecting Members' interest, the Chairman, in giving warm thanks to John, noted the huge logistic issues and preparatory work described in this revealing account which had opened Members' eyes to RAMC activity.

Next Meeting-8th May 2013:

- Special General Meeting 10.00AM

- General Meeting 10.45AM:

Tom Shovlin introducing Ewen McIntosh - "The Development of War in the 19th Century" 

 ---------------------------------------------------------------------

MINUTES OF MEETING AT RICHMOND GOLF CLUB-10th APRIL 2013-PRESENT 44-APOLOGIES!

Chairman John Horseman opened the meeting, welcoming members, including new member Vic Shadforth to the cosy warm environment. 
After updates on indisposed Members, the Secretary read citations for Committee approved Honorary Memberships for Denis Laidlaw, Angus Goodfellow and Philip Glithro. 
Members unanimously supported the three awards. After a long list of April Birthdays, the Minutes of the 13th March meeting were read, approved, and signed. 
The Chairman then updated members on his and the Treasurer`s meeting with the Cricket Club Chairman. There were some positives. The Treasurer gave further background 
to the proposed charges. It was agreed that the Special General meeting on the 8th May would commence at 10.00am.The Secretary would give advance notice of the question to be 
addressed supported by a note from the Treasurer on comparative subscriptions. A proxy voting facility would be available. Robert Riddell thanked members for the 
encouraging response to the planned Leeds trip.
The Chairman then invited member John Deighton to talk about “50 years among the Mountains” “There`s something about the Mountains that moves us all” attributed to 
mountaineer and author Joe Simpson clearly induced in John a passion for the inherent dangers, beauty and mystique that highlands and peaks provide. In a wonderfully 
illustrated life story, supplemented by anecdotal memories, the detail seemingly fresh in his memory, Probus members were privileged to share John`s remarkable account -including spectacular and at times vertiginous photography.
As a youth, he enjoyed the freedom of walking, camping and skiing, albeit with primitive gear, sleeping in the back of a van. These pursuits took him to Norway and 
then National Service provided travel, rock climbing and kindred spirits. In 1967 he started The Swaledale Outdoor Club, undertaking climbs in Snowdonia and Scotland. 
An old international tractor and rope were improvised for a Gunnerside Ski Slope facility.The remainder of his story presents an awesome international walking and 
climbing travelogue. John`s pictorial account included Helvelyn, Great Gable in Wasdale, walks in France, working in Africa which facilitated climbing Mt Kenya, 
the Lewis Glacier, Kilimanjaro from the Kibo Hut, and the spectacular sunrise. Then it was on the ridge at Glencoe and skiing in Val d`isere. Back living in South 
Africa we saw John up Table and the Drakenberg Mountains, the Barrier of Spears and panoramic views from Cleft Peak. Retirement in 1967 provided a world tour taking
in New Zealand; Tongariro Mountain and its Emerald lakes, and Ayers Rock and The Olgas in Australia. Later holidays took in Bali, 17000ft up Annapurna, trekking 
through the Atlas mountains in Morocco and latterly climbing Munros in winter. In conclusion, notwithstanding all his travels and visiting glorious locations, 
John finds no difficulty in returning to the beauty of Swaledale and of course to Richmond which is to him “Special”.
The Chairman thanked John for the world tour up Mountains, warmly endorsed by members. He recalled joining the group trip to South Africa. He had found it 
difficult to keep up with John`s long legs, yet appreciated the suicidal climbs.
Next meeting 24th April 2013.John Dickinson “War in the Gulf 1991.”

MINUTES OF  MEETING - 13th MARCH 2013 - PRESENT 39 - APOLOGIES 7 

Vice Chairman John Deighton opened the meeting, welcomed members and guest speaker Peter Norton. After updates on indisposed Members, Committee`s approval of Vic Shadforth`s  membership application was unanimously endorsed. After the March Birthdays, the Minutes of the13th Feb. meeting were approved and signed and those for the 27th Feb. meeting were read, approved, and signed.The Secretary thanked members for supporting the forthcoming Luncheon for which specific seats have only been allocated to those making prior application. The Secretary then gave an update on the issue of the future meetings venue, the Constitutional considerations dealing with change, the likely costings and possible alternative venues. After many questions and opinions, on a show of hands, a majority of members preferred a proposed alternative, but should the current venue continue a majority preferred reducing the number of meetings and cost by the summer outing and by an August break. Members requested a trial meeting at the alternative new venue before a Special General Meeting needed to formally agree and approve change.
Robert Riddell gave an update on the proposed trip to The Royal Armouries and Tropical World early in June. Precise details and sign up available from the next meeting.  
The Vice Chairman then asked Geoff Robinson to introduce Dr Peter Norton to talk about 
“Fracking and Fertiliser”. Peter, a Geologist formerly with the NCB, Mining Engineer and  Consultant, has 47 years experience in this field. In a knowledgeable  and illuminating expose of the title, Members were first familiarised with the enormity of auto stacking rigs and their technical ability; Halliburton blow out preventers and the attendant controversy, restrictions, and safety issues in the tough drilling environment. Fracking,a process of drilling and injecting fluid into the ground at high pressure to fracture shale rocks, may cause vibrations measurable on the Richter scale, requiring a careful geological survey of existing fractures. Near to home, members learnt of the York Potash  project close to Whitby, Sirius Mineral`s flagship development asset. It targets Polyhalite, an evaporite multi-nutrient mineral containing four of the six macro nutrients for plant growth i.e. potassium, sulphur, magnesium and calcium. All vital for civilisations survival, this resource is the largest and highest grade Polyhalite in the world with huge economic potential for the locality and the UK. Sadly, Peter`s excellent address was foreshortened because of earlier Probus business. He was warmly thanked by the Vice Chairman and Members for his very enjoyable talk. It once again endorsed Yorkshire speak: "Where there`s muck there`s brass".

Next meeting 10th April 2013 - John Deighton - "50 years among the Mountains".

MINUTES OF MEETING -27th FEBRUARY 2013-PRESENT 32-APOLOGIES 8 

Chairman John Horseman opened the meeting, welcomed the sunny weather and guest prospective member Vic Shadforth. He particularly welcomed the return of Roy Cross looking hale and hearty. After updates on indisposed members the Secretary humbly rose and apologised for forgetting to bring along the minutes of the previous meeting. On a serious note he advised that he had just been informed that the Cricket Club from the 1st April 2013 proposed to introduce a very substantial meeting charge. He said he had immediately expressed disappointment at the unduly short notice and now awaited these proposals in writing. After members questions, he advised that the Committee would consider the Club`s position including possible alternative venues and report back at the next meeting. After an update on the Spring Luncheon bookings, closing date the 13th March, Robert Riddell advised that The Royal Armouries, Leeds was the choice of the outings sub group. A date to be decided in May, June or September would be at a modest cost. Further details shortly.
The Chairman then invited Member & past Chairman Keith Jackson to talk about “The Challenge of Thruscross.” Thruscross Reservoir is the most northerly and highest of four reservoirs in the Washburn Valley lying north of Otley and west of Harrogate. Keith joined a Leeds Corporation design team in 1960 as a relatively junior qualified engineer .
In an interesting talk, Keith described some of the geological and technical problems of construction and his own valuable contribution to the dam`s design, his model first fashioned at home out of potato linked together with skewers! Members learnt of issues with the removal of the local kinderscout sandstone and techniques employed to build the 600ft long concrete barrier utilising 15x40ft long triangular interlocking concrete blocks fashioned to provide independent stability and minimum tension. A grand scale of earthmoving equipment was employed and the eventual utilisation of rock sourced from Scorton provided a sound North Yorkshire base.The Reservoir flooded the semi derelict village of West End, which still can be glimpsed during severe drought. Keith closed by sharing a home video of a nostalgic visit with a colleague to a now serene environment enjoyed by walkers, canoeists, anglers and wildlife as it quietly feeds down into the Washburn Valley.
After a number of member questions, the Chairman thanked Keith for his fascinating talk, warmly endorsed by Members.
Next Meeting 13th March- “Fracking and Fertiliser”-Dr Peter North.

MINUTES OF MEETING -13th FEBRUARY 2013-PRESENT 27- APOLOGIES 9 

Chairman John Horseman opened the meeting, referring to the arctic like weather. He welcomed new member Roger Frier, speakers Judith Bromfield, John Atkins and new member Vic Shadforth, guest of Nigel Copstake. On a sad note, he referred to the recent passing of Ernest Clowes, a great character, and former member John Curry. Members stood in silent tribute. After updates on unwell members, the Chairman advised that resignations had been received from Ralph Waggett and Mike Wood. After the February birthday announcements, the Minutes of the meeting on the 23rd January were read, approved and signed. Robert Riddell asked for views on a choice of locations for the summer outing. The Secretary will mail details to those not present. He will also distribute the menu for the Spring lunch. The Chairman then asked Mike Bacon to introduce the speakers. Judith distinguished between the The Richmond Council for Volunteers, the title of the talk, which is a Registered Charity supporting other charities, and The Volunteer Centre, which provides an extensive range of support services to individuals. John explained that the Centre is one of a National Network of volunteer centres recruiting, placing, and supporting volunteers in the local community. Pressed for time, John provided a rapid resume of the range of projects and assistance available-including transport for medical appointments, digital switchover, winter warmth, energy audits, and loans of projectors,laptops and screens to name just a few. Fuller detail can be found on the Centre`s web site. Judith explained that the Council provides advice and support in relation to all aspects of community voluntary activity. This might typically be a project to benefit people in the community, or assistance in applying for and raising funds. She provided many examples of what this might embrace, including strategic planning, fitness for funding, H & S issues, CRB check procedures, and much more, concluding with detail of the Council`s planned relocation to the Lower School old buildings. The Chairman, supported by members, warmly thanked Judith for the very informative talk, and the many pamphlets supplied. He applauded the work of the many volunteers who support the local community. Next meeting 27th February-member Keith Jackson-”The Challenge of Thruscross”

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------  

 MINUTES OF MEETING - 23rd JANUARY 2013 - PRESENT 30 - APOLOGIES 6

Chairman John Horseman opened the meeting, noted the pleasing attendance in view of the weather, welcomed members including new members Peter Clarke and John Harland, and the day`s speaker Jos Huddleston. Updates were received on the health of Angus Goodfellow, Ernest Clowes and Philip Glithro, very best wishes were expressed by all. A new membership application from Roger Frier, approved by the Committee was unanimously supported by members. The minutes of the meeting on the 9th January 2013 were read, approved and signed. Michael Gauntlett reported that the Club Web Site was now up and running again and was thanked by the Chairman. Under Any Other Business, the Secretary said he would send the post-meeting lunch menu for the 13th February by e-mail. Partners,friends and guests welcome to join members. The Chairman then invited Keith Robson to introduce Jos Huddleston to talk abouut “The Richmondshire Museum”.Jos`s background including Headship of Richmond Methodist School until 1996 lead him in retirement to developing an educational programme for the Museum and it`s Discovery Learning Centre, the subject of his talk.The aim is to assist and promote children`s evaluation of their own lives, providing a nostalgic perspective and comparatives with today`s Richmond. Partly supported by a lottery grant, the Centre achieves this through interactive displays and talks by volunteers.The objective being to create a setting for children`s ideas to develop. In each room the story of an historic character is displayed on screen, role play exercises follow with the opportunity to wear Victorian dress.The centre also features the work of William Sanderson, a reconstructed Cruck House, the 2nd World War experience for Richmond people and an IT Centre. Jos`s talk embraced a descriptive walk through guide to the Centre, the successful 2012 school`s launch and the perceived partnership with other Richmond attractions. Member`s many questions displayed their own nostalgia and suggested much support for the educational benefits. Warmly supported by members, the Chairman thanked Jos for his very interesting and informative talk. Next meeting-13th February 2013.- Mike Bacon introducing Judith Bromfield-”Richmond Council for Volunteer Services”.

-------------------------------------

MINUTES OF MEETING - 9th JANUARY 2013-PRESENT 32-APOLOGIES 9.

 Chairman John Horseman opened the meeting,welcomed members including prospective new member Roger Frier, guest of Nigel Copestake. New sick reports were received on both Angus Goodfellow and Ernest Clowes.The Chairman expressed best wishes from Members. New Membership applications from Peter Hart and John Harland were unanimously approved. After the December and January Birthday announcements, including a grievous error by the Secretary, the Minutes of the meeting of the 28th November were read, approved and signed. Matters arising, members indicated general approval of the 2012 xmas luncheon arrangements. After the Chairman issued a reminder re outstanding subs, under AOB, the Secretary gave notice that he was stepping down from organisation of the Summer outing.He thanked Chris Robinson, Robert Riddell &Tony Baker who are to form a new sub group for this purpose. Additional members welcome. Michael Gauntlett explained issues with the Club Web site which will be restored shortly. The Chairman then invited new member Chris Robinson to talk about "The Battle of the Somme.” Stepping into the ( speaking) breach at short notice, Chris, a former History teacher, had developed his talk following school trips to Northern France. There is no comfortable way to describe 60,000 casualties on the 1st July 1916, this the worst day in the history of the British Army. Its location The Somme a byword for futile and indiscriminate slaughter. Chris reminded members of this bloodiest of military operations, with over a million casualties, with sensitivity, poignancy and respect, carefully highlighting the dreadful underfoot conditions, the crude trenches and dugouts of the British compared to German trench sophistication, the naïve strategy of Haigh in announcing his intentions in advance, and the operational suicide of slowly advancing to the enemy on open ground with inferior artillery. In September 1916, the introduction of tanks not fit for purpose has echoes more recently. Very little was gained in enemy territory but very valuable lessons were learnt by the British in tactics and weaponry that were to prove decisive in achieving eventual victory. Chris followed up his pertinent account with appropriate and sensitive acknowledgement of the excellent work of the War Graves commission with slides of the very moving monumental tributes to the young lives lost, on both sides. The German toll - almost equally horrendous, was reflected in members questions of his most interesting account. The Chairman, in thanking Chris for his detailed analysis, warmly endorsed by members, reflected on the overriding impression of the futility of war. Next meeting 23rd January 2013- ”The Richmondshire Museum”- Speaker Jos Huddleston.

---------------------------------------------------------- 

MINUTES OF MEETING -14th NOVEMBER 2012-PRESENT 35-APOLOGIES 7

After the November Birthdays, the Minutes of the 26th October meeting were read, approved and signed. There were no matters arising.Under AOB, a Xmas lunch booking deadline of 28 November was advised as was the impending issue of updated Membership Lists. Bev Joicey gave notice of a forthcoming Film & Brunch event, and a beginners computer course, Fred Jary advised that The Greyfriars Restaurant had reopened. Discontent with the pre- meeting tea&coffee self- service arrangements was expressed-echoed by several members.The Secy suggested it might be an economics issue. After adjourning for the 32nd AGM, Geoffrey Robinson introduced Rod Fisher, a professional Will, Trust & Probate Specialist, former deep sea diver and travel enthusiast. In a thought provoking analysis of the care system and its financial implications, Rod quickly raised awareness of sensitive family financial issues and distressing pitfalls. In a scenario where children are unlikely to care for parents, and where spiralling care costs can strip the infirm of carefully accumulated assets and the greater part of income- the avoidance of diminution of this order, Rod suggested, requires careful decision making and consideration of possible financial instruments to lessen the impact, eg Protective Property, Flexible Life Interest and Fortress Trusts all, with specialist advice, should be considered. The immediate impact of unexpected mental incapacity can result in a person`s income and assets being frozen, inaccessible for extended periods and which may cause severe hardship. Rod advised members to strongly consider the insurance of a Lasting Power of Attorney to ease access to financial management. In his frank expose of the reality of means testing and the care costs involved, members were no doubt mindful of the likely long term financial impact of incapacity to themselves and loved ones-as suggested by the many questions that followed. In thanking Rod for providing access to notes on the subject matter, the incoming Chairman John Horseman said members were indebted to Rod for highlighting the issues, a sobering matter for all.
Next meeting 28th November-when Bob Burrell-Corey will present “ A Miscellany of Interesting Pictures and Moving Images”

MINUTES OF MEETING AT RICHMONDSHIRE CRICKET CLUB - 12 JUNE 2013

MINUTES OF ORDINARY MEETING

 12 FEBRUARY 2014

1        Chairman John Deighton welcomed the 37 members present. There were no guests and apologies from 7. He reported that John Ward was recovering well from a recent operation.

2        Birthdays; these were David Whittaker (89), Chris Payne (84), Geoff Robinson (78) and Keith Robson (77).

3        Minutes: those from 22 January were read, approved and signed by the Chairman.  There were no matters arising.

4         Lunches: Stephen Charlton reminded members intending to participate of the need to pay and indicate menu choices for 26 March if they had not already so done. He hoped members would support the after meeting lunch at the Black Lion on 12 March.

5        Trips: Robert Riddell announced that a note was circulating for members to indicate a preference (and potential numbers) for a summer trip to one of Salford Quays, Skipton or Carlisle. Speed was important because if Salford was chosen the BBC need a 4 month period of notice. Chris Robinson would be contacting all members to ensure those not present were consulted.

          Chris Robinson asked for a show of hands of potential interest in a trip to the battlefields of World War 1. There was sufficient response for him to proceed with preliminary planning.

6       12 March: Michael Larkman clarified that the meeting would be an open discussion and that he had already got 6 active contributors lined up. All contributions will be welcome.

      “The World of Racing Pigeons”

          David Crane introduced Ged Barker, an enthusiast since the age of 8.

Racing began in the 1760s amongst the leisured classes and expanded in scope and social status from the middle of the 19th century. There has been Royal interest (at Sandringham) since 1886 and many associations and clubs have been formed in North East England. At its height the sport had 7 million flights per annum but activists had now declined to some 42,000. Ged mentioned pigeons’ war service in the world wars with 32 awards of the pigeon VC, the Dickins Medal. He explained in detail what is required to set up a loft, the different lengths of races, the clocks used and cheating. Like many other activities the Chinese are becoming major players. Details were given of breeding, training, diseases and the dangers posed by hawks and falcons. The principal motivation for the birds to return home appeared to be sex. Questions followed on sexing birds (difficult), insurance (non existent), and testing for drugs (increasing).

The Chairman thanked Ged for his illuminating talk and his open invitation to visit his loft in Skeeby.

8 Next Meeting: 26 February when John Harland will introduce Mike Amos on ‘The History of the Northern League.’

MINUTES OF THE MEETING OF 23 APRIL 2014

5 Lunches- Ian Dawson announced the Committee recommendation of Xmas Lunch at the King’s Head on 17th December, thus creating space for an ordinary meeting on the 10th. The Spring Lunch will be at the King’s Head on 26th March. The next after meeting lunch at the Black Lion will be on14th May. All these were agreed by the meeting.

The Chairman thanked Julia for a very informative talk and took heart form living in a low crime area. He hoped she will be successful in keeping that record.

Minutes of the Ordinary Meeting 9th April 2014

1. Welcome  Chairman John Deighton welcomed the       members attending.  There were no guests and there were      apologies.

2. Sickness Reports   Michael Gauntlett reported that Cedric Shaw was showing improvement and would attend shortly.  

3. Proposal for a New Member  Francis Rose who had been proposed by John Horseman and seconded by Chris Robinson was put to the members and agreed unanimously. 

4. April Birthdays were announced – Philip Cross (90) now 25 years a member of Probus.  Philip Harvey (76) Bev Joicey (73) Peter Clarke (72) Bill Green (72)  Colin Williamson (72) and Ian Dawson (70).

5. Lunches  Stephen Charlton asked for numbers who required lunch at the Black Lion so that he could telephone with reservations – there were 8 members.

6. Trips Sub Committee Robert Riddell asked for Member’s opinions on holding a trip to Skipton in June and/or Salford Quays and BBC Media City as and when the Club could be accommodated.  A list was circulated.

7. AOB  Michael Larkman apologised for the debate “Modern Education – A Vexed Question” on the 12th March as the debate had not gone as he had expected. 

8. Minutes of the 12th March were read, agreed and signed.  There were no matters arising.

9. Speaker  Peter Clarke introduced Andy Barlow who spoke about Richmondshire Cricket Club in the 2010’s.   

Andy thanked the Probus Club for their continuing support of the Cricket Club.  He stated that more use of IT such as Facebook, Twitter etc. is being used to promote the Club.

The Cricket Club was founded by George Roper in the early 1800’s on land given by Lord Zetland.  In 1905 a cycling track was added and the ground was given to the town and regular track cycling still takes place weekly, and also the Whit Monday Cycle Racing takes place. 

Andy showed a short video with some interesting scenes in Test Matches England v. Australia, England was creative with substitute rules.  There were also picture of Richmond Cricket Club being presented with the 2013 trophies.  The Club professionals recruited for the 2014 season are Shanuka Dissanayake and Gary Platt.   

The finances of the Cricket Club are continually having to be reviewed.  Professional expenses, including  games, ground, clubhouse, equipment and umpires come to approximately £58,000 a year and the income from bar, membership, sponsors and fund raising approximately £63,000, the bar income making up 50% of this amount.

Andy continued his talk with explanations on the administration of Cricket in this country from grass roots through county, premier league and international level.  All of this overlooked by the ECB, England Cricket Board.

Richmond Cricket Club were heavily involved with the ECB Focus Club, The Chance to Shine to encourage young players, including ladies, and the Richmond Cricket Foundation which is making connections with Richmond School with a brand new pitch at the school and a pavilion.

2013 membership of the Club had been encouraging, 200 junior playing members which includes 50 girls, 50 adult players and 250 social members.  Membership fees are being invested in coaching schemes to children from six or seven years of age and the Club is a member of the Community Amateur Sports Club (CASC) which opens up the way to accessing grants etc. The Club runs 13 teams and has a partnership with the army with great help from the MOD, Help for Heroes etc.

The social side of the Club particularly the importance of bar takings has got to be the next priority for improvement.  Andy mentioned the Tour de France weekend when the Club is putting on “It’s a Knockout” as fund raising event.

Questions were taken from the floor discussing various aspects of the Club’s wellbeing.   The speaker was thanked by Chairman, John Deighton, for an interesting and informative talk.   Andy concluded his presentation by presenting the Probus Club with a cricket bat signed by Durham County players.

10 Next Meeting:   Wednesday 23rd April  John Brennand introducing  “My Job and My Policy” by Julia Mulligan, Police Commissioner for North Yorkshire.